Presentation Title

Programmatic Advertising: A Radical Industry Response to a Postmodern Population

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Watkins 2240

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

The American advertising industry became increasingly solidified when, in the early twentieth century, an oversupply of assembly line products was flooding the U.S. markets. Manufacturers needed to motivate consumers to purchase products, and the advertising industry went to work to help them accomplish this goal. An evolving post World War II society intensified changes in the industry. In the 1950s, the shift from a passive “cookie-cutter” population to a more splintered society challenged advertisers to create innovative marketing strategies that would appeal to an accelerating individualized market. Many advertising companies used these inventive approaches to meet new objectives that were being shaped by the fragmenting postmodern population. Other companies, however, retained a one-size-fits-all marketing approach--contemporary examples of which include television commercials directed to a mass audience. “Programmatic advertising” is currently replacing these and other traditional advertising techniques with methods that combine creative and technology-based marketing to appeal to specific demographics and individual tastes rather than to the perceived interests of a bundled, aggregate population. My review of programmatic advertising’s processes and procedures demonstrates how major cultural shifts can radically affect a U.S. industry.

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Nov 12th, 3:30 PM Nov 12th, 3:45 PM

Programmatic Advertising: A Radical Industry Response to a Postmodern Population

Watkins 2240

The American advertising industry became increasingly solidified when, in the early twentieth century, an oversupply of assembly line products was flooding the U.S. markets. Manufacturers needed to motivate consumers to purchase products, and the advertising industry went to work to help them accomplish this goal. An evolving post World War II society intensified changes in the industry. In the 1950s, the shift from a passive “cookie-cutter” population to a more splintered society challenged advertisers to create innovative marketing strategies that would appeal to an accelerating individualized market. Many advertising companies used these inventive approaches to meet new objectives that were being shaped by the fragmenting postmodern population. Other companies, however, retained a one-size-fits-all marketing approach--contemporary examples of which include television commercials directed to a mass audience. “Programmatic advertising” is currently replacing these and other traditional advertising techniques with methods that combine creative and technology-based marketing to appeal to specific demographics and individual tastes rather than to the perceived interests of a bundled, aggregate population. My review of programmatic advertising’s processes and procedures demonstrates how major cultural shifts can radically affect a U.S. industry.