Presentation Title

Wind Tunnel Investigation of Drag Reduction on a Wing by Use of Surface Micro-Channels (Riblets)

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 265

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

A wind tunnel experiment was designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate drag reduction on a wing of finite span by use of surface treatments. Three types of surface finishes were tested at an angle of attack of 5° and at various Reynolds numbers. These included the baseline 3D printed wing, a wing covered with smooth shrink wrap film called Monokote, and an adhesively backed film with patterns resembling shark dermal denticles from Sharklet Technologies. The latter treatment was placed in the adverse-pressure-gradient area of the wing. The wing of AR = 2 was mounted onto a vertical shaft, which was used as a sting and balance that measured drag values of each configuration. Strain gauges mounted onto the top of the shaft made up the force balance system that was designed and fabricated to measure bending loads due to aerodynamic drag. Drag experienced by the three configurations was measured, reduced, and compared. The data showed that the smooth Monokote film increased drag compared to the baseline wing, presumably because of the imperfections of the application technique. The Sharklet Technologies film showed a reduction in drag coefficient of about 4% compared to the baseline wing at a Reynolds numbers 1.5 million and approximately 14% compared to the smooth Monokote surface. The Sharklet film showed reduced drag at all Reynolds numbers over 750,000.

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Nov 12th, 10:00 AM Nov 12th, 10:15 AM

Wind Tunnel Investigation of Drag Reduction on a Wing by Use of Surface Micro-Channels (Riblets)

HUB 265

A wind tunnel experiment was designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate drag reduction on a wing of finite span by use of surface treatments. Three types of surface finishes were tested at an angle of attack of 5° and at various Reynolds numbers. These included the baseline 3D printed wing, a wing covered with smooth shrink wrap film called Monokote, and an adhesively backed film with patterns resembling shark dermal denticles from Sharklet Technologies. The latter treatment was placed in the adverse-pressure-gradient area of the wing. The wing of AR = 2 was mounted onto a vertical shaft, which was used as a sting and balance that measured drag values of each configuration. Strain gauges mounted onto the top of the shaft made up the force balance system that was designed and fabricated to measure bending loads due to aerodynamic drag. Drag experienced by the three configurations was measured, reduced, and compared. The data showed that the smooth Monokote film increased drag compared to the baseline wing, presumably because of the imperfections of the application technique. The Sharklet Technologies film showed a reduction in drag coefficient of about 4% compared to the baseline wing at a Reynolds numbers 1.5 million and approximately 14% compared to the smooth Monokote surface. The Sharklet film showed reduced drag at all Reynolds numbers over 750,000.