Presentation Title

The Jinetera of Cuba’s Pre-Revolutionary and Special Period Tourist Economy

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

MSE 113

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Cuban Studies scholars have published work critiquing the legitimacy of Fidel Castro's claim to have achieved gender and racial equality through the Cuban Revolution of 1959. Scholars like Alejandro de la Fuente and Meghan Daigle argue that unaddressed racial and gender inequalities have recently become hyper-present under Special Period conditions. Because of worsening economic conditions, the Cuban government was forced to take a few market orientated measures to stimulate the economy, this including the legalization of the American dollar in 1993. With the legalization of the dollar and state marketing, Cuba opened its doors to more international tourism, but my research explores how and why this tourism is different from that of Pre-Revolutionary Cuba. In particular, I explore the representation of the jinetera, the Cuban woman engaging in sex work for the tourist. The outsiders understanding of the jinetera depends upon a dense history of the gendering and racializing of Cuba and its national identity. My research explores how the representation of the jinetera has changed throughout contemporary Cuban cultural productions, and how its contributed to an outsiders cultural understanding of Cuba as a nation state.

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Nov 12th, 3:00 PM Nov 12th, 3:15 PM

The Jinetera of Cuba’s Pre-Revolutionary and Special Period Tourist Economy

MSE 113

Cuban Studies scholars have published work critiquing the legitimacy of Fidel Castro's claim to have achieved gender and racial equality through the Cuban Revolution of 1959. Scholars like Alejandro de la Fuente and Meghan Daigle argue that unaddressed racial and gender inequalities have recently become hyper-present under Special Period conditions. Because of worsening economic conditions, the Cuban government was forced to take a few market orientated measures to stimulate the economy, this including the legalization of the American dollar in 1993. With the legalization of the dollar and state marketing, Cuba opened its doors to more international tourism, but my research explores how and why this tourism is different from that of Pre-Revolutionary Cuba. In particular, I explore the representation of the jinetera, the Cuban woman engaging in sex work for the tourist. The outsiders understanding of the jinetera depends upon a dense history of the gendering and racializing of Cuba and its national identity. My research explores how the representation of the jinetera has changed throughout contemporary Cuban cultural productions, and how its contributed to an outsiders cultural understanding of Cuba as a nation state.