Presentation Title

Feasibility of Utilizing Orange Pomace for Food Applications

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

MSE 011

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Food by-product is becoming an issue in the food industry. Large amounts of orange pomace, which is the leftover solid remains after pressing for juice, are usually disposed in a landfill. Orange pomace contains many phenolic compounds and dietary fiber along with other minor bioactive ingredients. Therefore, the goal of this project is to investigate the technical feasibility of utilizing dehydrated orange pomace powder for food applications.

Two challenges were identified and solution was sought after through a series of experiments. The first challenge was related to size reduction after dehydration to convert the pomace to a fine powder. The second challenge was to determine the potential microbial activity and/or antimicrobial properties associated with certain compounds in the pomace.

Orange pomace in its wet state was subject to a pre-treatment using a meat grinder before dehydration. The dried mass was then ground to a fine powder using a burr mill (mainly for cereal grains) and a spice knife grinder. The spice grinder presented better results in terms of milling time, ease of operation, and yield of smaller particles with uniform size distribution. The finest pomace powder less than 355 micrometers was used to determine water activity and fiber content at 0.4 and 42.6%, respectively, and was also added at 5% and 10% levels to make fiber-enriched pasta. Through an antimicrobial testing, it was determined that at a 5% level B. cereus and E. faecalis were inhibited when the orange pomace powder was added to the culture medium.

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Nov 12th, 2:30 PM Nov 12th, 2:45 PM

Feasibility of Utilizing Orange Pomace for Food Applications

MSE 011

Food by-product is becoming an issue in the food industry. Large amounts of orange pomace, which is the leftover solid remains after pressing for juice, are usually disposed in a landfill. Orange pomace contains many phenolic compounds and dietary fiber along with other minor bioactive ingredients. Therefore, the goal of this project is to investigate the technical feasibility of utilizing dehydrated orange pomace powder for food applications.

Two challenges were identified and solution was sought after through a series of experiments. The first challenge was related to size reduction after dehydration to convert the pomace to a fine powder. The second challenge was to determine the potential microbial activity and/or antimicrobial properties associated with certain compounds in the pomace.

Orange pomace in its wet state was subject to a pre-treatment using a meat grinder before dehydration. The dried mass was then ground to a fine powder using a burr mill (mainly for cereal grains) and a spice knife grinder. The spice grinder presented better results in terms of milling time, ease of operation, and yield of smaller particles with uniform size distribution. The finest pomace powder less than 355 micrometers was used to determine water activity and fiber content at 0.4 and 42.6%, respectively, and was also added at 5% and 10% levels to make fiber-enriched pasta. Through an antimicrobial testing, it was determined that at a 5% level B. cereus and E. faecalis were inhibited when the orange pomace powder was added to the culture medium.