Presentation Title

Image Processing for Flow Visualization of Flame Tilting

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

MSE 011

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

With the development in computer sciences especially in the field of computer vision, image processing has become an inevitable part of flow visualization. Computer vision can be used to visualize flow structure and to quantify its properties. Computer vision algorithms were utilized to study the tilting of fire plumes as they interact with each other. As two fire plumes start to move towards each other, the area of air entrainment of two plumes starts to overlap, causing the amount of air available for the fires in the overlapping area to decrease, which this will cause the fire plumes to tilt towards each other. In our experimental setup, Aspen wood was used as the fuel source and various configurations of the fuel were investigated. Using a digital camera, the images of the experiment were obtained. In the image processing, the flames were isolated from the image by using edge detection techniques. Which then we develop an algorithm to calculate the flame height, orientation, distance between two plumes, and the flame area. The results demonstrated that as the size of the flame was increasing, the flames started tilting towards each other, concluding that there should be a critical area in the fires, enabling tilting flames.

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Nov 12th, 3:30 PM Nov 12th, 3:45 PM

Image Processing for Flow Visualization of Flame Tilting

MSE 011

With the development in computer sciences especially in the field of computer vision, image processing has become an inevitable part of flow visualization. Computer vision can be used to visualize flow structure and to quantify its properties. Computer vision algorithms were utilized to study the tilting of fire plumes as they interact with each other. As two fire plumes start to move towards each other, the area of air entrainment of two plumes starts to overlap, causing the amount of air available for the fires in the overlapping area to decrease, which this will cause the fire plumes to tilt towards each other. In our experimental setup, Aspen wood was used as the fuel source and various configurations of the fuel were investigated. Using a digital camera, the images of the experiment were obtained. In the image processing, the flames were isolated from the image by using edge detection techniques. Which then we develop an algorithm to calculate the flame height, orientation, distance between two plumes, and the flame area. The results demonstrated that as the size of the flame was increasing, the flames started tilting towards each other, concluding that there should be a critical area in the fires, enabling tilting flames.