Presentation Title

Making Science Fly: Optimization of Opportunistic Navigation Experimental Testbed for Small UAVs

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

MSE 011

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Currently, most navigation systems on autonomous vehicles rely mainly on global navigation satellite system (GNSS), which may become unreliable in jammed and/or spoofed environments. These systems can be made more robust by using signals that were not intended for navigation but can be exploited for navigation purposes (e.g., cellular and digital television). Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) experiments became recently possible after two major challenges were overcome: (i) meeting different bandwidth requirements for different SOPs; (ii) making the payload of the navigation system light enough to fly on a small UAV. Cellular code division multiple access (CDMA) signals, which require a bandwidth of 2.5MHz, and long-term evolution (LTE) signals, which require a bandwidth of up to 20MHz, are the signals currently considered for UAV experiments. The state-of-the-art in self-contained embedded universal software radio peripherals that meets the small UAV payload requirement, namely the Ettus E312, is only capable of a maximum bandwidth of 2.2MHz to the onboard storage. With the assistance of an embedded computer connected to the E312 via Gigabit Ethernet, a maximum bandwidth of 15MHz was achieved; 5MHz above the maximum bandwidth specification provided by the manufacturer. Moreover, data from other sensors such as the inertial measurement unit onboard the E312 were also used by the navigation system. These requirements produce an incredible workload for the embedded system and require optimization of parameters such as processor workload, memory, and input/output operations. The proposed system has seen flight time and has been able to gather data in real-world situations.

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Nov 12th, 3:45 PM Nov 12th, 4:00 PM

Making Science Fly: Optimization of Opportunistic Navigation Experimental Testbed for Small UAVs

MSE 011

Currently, most navigation systems on autonomous vehicles rely mainly on global navigation satellite system (GNSS), which may become unreliable in jammed and/or spoofed environments. These systems can be made more robust by using signals that were not intended for navigation but can be exploited for navigation purposes (e.g., cellular and digital television). Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) experiments became recently possible after two major challenges were overcome: (i) meeting different bandwidth requirements for different SOPs; (ii) making the payload of the navigation system light enough to fly on a small UAV. Cellular code division multiple access (CDMA) signals, which require a bandwidth of 2.5MHz, and long-term evolution (LTE) signals, which require a bandwidth of up to 20MHz, are the signals currently considered for UAV experiments. The state-of-the-art in self-contained embedded universal software radio peripherals that meets the small UAV payload requirement, namely the Ettus E312, is only capable of a maximum bandwidth of 2.2MHz to the onboard storage. With the assistance of an embedded computer connected to the E312 via Gigabit Ethernet, a maximum bandwidth of 15MHz was achieved; 5MHz above the maximum bandwidth specification provided by the manufacturer. Moreover, data from other sensors such as the inertial measurement unit onboard the E312 were also used by the navigation system. These requirements produce an incredible workload for the embedded system and require optimization of parameters such as processor workload, memory, and input/output operations. The proposed system has seen flight time and has been able to gather data in real-world situations.