Presentation Title

Exploring Ethnic Identity Formation in the 626

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 268

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine how the ethnic identities of first and second generation Asians and Latinos are influenced by interactions with one another. Previous scholarship on interactions between Asians and Latinos have focused on either solidarity in politics or housing laws as the basis for these interactions. This research focuses on culture as a common ground for first and second generation Asians and Latinos living in the San Gabriel Valley, an area located fifteen minutes from east Los Angeles and known for having a large Asian and Latino population. Despite the current demographics of the area, it was only fifty years ago that the housing market in the San Gabriel Valley opened to non-white, non-black homebuyers for the first time. Many second and third generation Latinos and Asians took advantage of this opportunity and began to inhabit areas such as Monterey Park, which resulted in white flight, thus further establishing Latino and Asian neighborhoods. In order to understand how ethnic identities are formed amongst these two groups, a theoretical framework on ethnic identity will be used as a base for this study. Literature reviews of existing scholarship along with interviews with alumni of high schools within the San Gabriel Valley will be utilized to gain better understanding of the influence of daily interactions on ethnic identity.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 10:45 AM Nov 12th, 11:00 AM

Exploring Ethnic Identity Formation in the 626

HUB 268

The purpose of this study is to examine how the ethnic identities of first and second generation Asians and Latinos are influenced by interactions with one another. Previous scholarship on interactions between Asians and Latinos have focused on either solidarity in politics or housing laws as the basis for these interactions. This research focuses on culture as a common ground for first and second generation Asians and Latinos living in the San Gabriel Valley, an area located fifteen minutes from east Los Angeles and known for having a large Asian and Latino population. Despite the current demographics of the area, it was only fifty years ago that the housing market in the San Gabriel Valley opened to non-white, non-black homebuyers for the first time. Many second and third generation Latinos and Asians took advantage of this opportunity and began to inhabit areas such as Monterey Park, which resulted in white flight, thus further establishing Latino and Asian neighborhoods. In order to understand how ethnic identities are formed amongst these two groups, a theoretical framework on ethnic identity will be used as a base for this study. Literature reviews of existing scholarship along with interviews with alumni of high schools within the San Gabriel Valley will be utilized to gain better understanding of the influence of daily interactions on ethnic identity.