Presentation Title

Directed Energy Comet Deflection Simulations

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 265

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Heating of a comet nucleus activates sublimation-driven jets which shifts the comet’s trajectory. Artificial heating of a comet, such as by a high-powered laser, may supplement natural heating by the Sun to purposefully manipulate its path to avoid an impact. Such a laser may be positioned and operate in Earth orbit, or if equipped with an appropriate adaptive optics system, from the ground. Heating response varies dramatically from comet to comet and depends on factors like nucleus size, dynamical age and orbit. These factors are incorporated into a numerical orbital model to compute the effectiveness of a particular deflection system on various classes of known comets. Results suggest that a diffraction-limited 500 m laser array operating at 10 GW for 10 min/day may be sufficient to divert a typical active 500 m comet from an impact given 1 yr warning. A larger 1 km array operating at 100 GW for 100 s/day is similarly effective.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 3:30 PM Nov 12th, 3:45 PM

Directed Energy Comet Deflection Simulations

HUB 265

Heating of a comet nucleus activates sublimation-driven jets which shifts the comet’s trajectory. Artificial heating of a comet, such as by a high-powered laser, may supplement natural heating by the Sun to purposefully manipulate its path to avoid an impact. Such a laser may be positioned and operate in Earth orbit, or if equipped with an appropriate adaptive optics system, from the ground. Heating response varies dramatically from comet to comet and depends on factors like nucleus size, dynamical age and orbit. These factors are incorporated into a numerical orbital model to compute the effectiveness of a particular deflection system on various classes of known comets. Results suggest that a diffraction-limited 500 m laser array operating at 10 GW for 10 min/day may be sufficient to divert a typical active 500 m comet from an impact given 1 yr warning. A larger 1 km array operating at 100 GW for 100 s/day is similarly effective.