Presentation Title

Fanny's On The Big Screen: The Adaptation of Fanny Price for Modern Audience

Presenter Information

Kiara Downs, Whittier CollegeFollow

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 260

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

This research looks at Austen’s Mansfield Park and its period drama film adaptations, analyzing the way the film adapts its’ heroine Fanny Price. Fanny is unlike many Austen heroines who appeal to modern day readers and viewers. She is shy, unsocial, reserved, and often fades into the background. This creates a dilemma in adapting her for the big screen because her characteristics are not what appeal to modern day viewers of Austen Adaptations. This information informs the research question: how is Fanny adapted in period drama adaptations of Mansfield Park and how does that effect the narrative as a whole? The method this study employs is Cheryl Nixon’s idea a “visual vocabulary” of the text in film adaptation: examining if the film creates a visual representation of the text or instead takes creative liberties by altering the moral or thematic thrust of the plot. A historical framework is used to analyze the way in which Fanny is described and interacts with other characters in the novel. To contextualize this information’s relationship to the films, the theory of adaptation is implemented. These two aspects of the study merge to understand the way in which Fanny is adapted for modern day audiences by either creating a visual vocabulary or taking creative liberties, and its overall effect on the narrative.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 3:45 PM Nov 12th, 4:00 PM

Fanny's On The Big Screen: The Adaptation of Fanny Price for Modern Audience

HUB 260

This research looks at Austen’s Mansfield Park and its period drama film adaptations, analyzing the way the film adapts its’ heroine Fanny Price. Fanny is unlike many Austen heroines who appeal to modern day readers and viewers. She is shy, unsocial, reserved, and often fades into the background. This creates a dilemma in adapting her for the big screen because her characteristics are not what appeal to modern day viewers of Austen Adaptations. This information informs the research question: how is Fanny adapted in period drama adaptations of Mansfield Park and how does that effect the narrative as a whole? The method this study employs is Cheryl Nixon’s idea a “visual vocabulary” of the text in film adaptation: examining if the film creates a visual representation of the text or instead takes creative liberties by altering the moral or thematic thrust of the plot. A historical framework is used to analyze the way in which Fanny is described and interacts with other characters in the novel. To contextualize this information’s relationship to the films, the theory of adaptation is implemented. These two aspects of the study merge to understand the way in which Fanny is adapted for modern day audiences by either creating a visual vocabulary or taking creative liberties, and its overall effect on the narrative.