Presentation Title

Potential Interaction between Dietary Fiber and Iron in Extruded Food Products

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

MSE 011

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Food fortification is an effective means to deliver micronutrients to the human body. Similarly, functional foods have been identified as effective delivery systems for various nutraceuticals including dietary fiber. However, there is a concern that increased intake of dietary fiber may cause a potentially negative effect on mineral absorption. Hence, it is necessary to investigate the potential interactions between dietary fiber and minerals when both are added in same food matrices such as pasta. Seven selected dietary fiber sources (barley, oat bran, resistant starch, olive pomace, orange pomace, green vegetable pomace, and cricket powder) and two forms of ferrous fumarate (original powder form and microencapsulated premix form) were added to a base formulation using one of the selected cereal grain flours (durum semolina, whole wheat flour, and rice flour) to make extruded products in the form of pasta or rice-shaped kernels. The samples collected after extrusion and dehydration were measured with water activity and other quality attributes. The total dietary fiber was measured using an automated Dietary Fiber Analyzer, while an Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (AAS) was used to quantify the iron content and iron release rate in a simulated gastric fluid. The results suggested that it is feasible to incorporate fiber sources in extruded products with 5% addition level leading to the most acceptable quality and sensory properties. There is no apparent loss of total fiber during extrusion and cooking processes; however, the iron release in the simulated bioavailability test was affected to some extent, which needs further examination.

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Nov 12th, 2:15 PM Nov 12th, 2:30 PM

Potential Interaction between Dietary Fiber and Iron in Extruded Food Products

MSE 011

Food fortification is an effective means to deliver micronutrients to the human body. Similarly, functional foods have been identified as effective delivery systems for various nutraceuticals including dietary fiber. However, there is a concern that increased intake of dietary fiber may cause a potentially negative effect on mineral absorption. Hence, it is necessary to investigate the potential interactions between dietary fiber and minerals when both are added in same food matrices such as pasta. Seven selected dietary fiber sources (barley, oat bran, resistant starch, olive pomace, orange pomace, green vegetable pomace, and cricket powder) and two forms of ferrous fumarate (original powder form and microencapsulated premix form) were added to a base formulation using one of the selected cereal grain flours (durum semolina, whole wheat flour, and rice flour) to make extruded products in the form of pasta or rice-shaped kernels. The samples collected after extrusion and dehydration were measured with water activity and other quality attributes. The total dietary fiber was measured using an automated Dietary Fiber Analyzer, while an Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (AAS) was used to quantify the iron content and iron release rate in a simulated gastric fluid. The results suggested that it is feasible to incorporate fiber sources in extruded products with 5% addition level leading to the most acceptable quality and sensory properties. There is no apparent loss of total fiber during extrusion and cooking processes; however, the iron release in the simulated bioavailability test was affected to some extent, which needs further examination.