Presentation Title

Socioeconomic Determinants of Public Opinion on Foreign Investmets

Presenter Information

Mihailo Vuja, Whittier CollegeFollow

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Watkins 1117

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Foreign investment has been a crucial ingredient for economic growth in emerging markets and developing economies. Even so, public opinion on this topic has not always been uniform. Quite often, opinion has become diverse and, at times, the desirability of foreign investment has been a contentious issue. Accordingly, there are individuals that have positive opinions of foreign investment while others do not. It is, therefore, unsurprising that a considerable number of prior studies have examined public opinion of foreign investment. What is surprising is that the socioeconomic characteristics and determents of public opinion have been greatly understudied. As such, there remain several open empirical questions that this paper addresses. More specifically, this work focuses on socio-economic determinants of public opinion on foreign investment using survey poll data from the Pew Research Center’s 2014 Global Attitudes Project, which surveyed individuals in 44 countries. In this survey, respondents reveal their views on the inflow of foreign investments in their country of residence by employing a scale that represents positive and negative attitudes. The nature of the data allows this topic to be examined using linear probability models, binomial probit and binomial logit techniques and the ordered logit estimation method. This paper establishes that individuals with higher educational attainment tend to have a positive attitude towards foreign investments; however, this attitude varies according to the level of economic and social development of their country of residence. Additionally, individual income is similarly related to public opinion, where wealthier individuals are more likely to express positive attitudes (again, however, with variation across economies). Besides the contributions of developing a better understanding of opinions towards foreign investment in an economic sense, this paper also considers sociological, psychological and political aspects, to the respective extents possible. Specifically, I have developed ann empirical model that is based on the previous literature regarding attitudes towards foreign investments. Using the Pew data, I have also constructed the variables and best corresponding econometric models to identify the socioeconomic determents of public opinion on foreign investment. Finally, by considering variation in the determinants of public opinion across advanced and developing economies, I provide important insights that are beneficial for several disciplines. . The resulting enhanced understanding of the socioeconomic determinants and individual preference towards foreign investments affords important insights into policymaking and economic and political disciplines.

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Nov 12th, 11:15 AM Nov 12th, 11:30 AM

Socioeconomic Determinants of Public Opinion on Foreign Investmets

Watkins 1117

Foreign investment has been a crucial ingredient for economic growth in emerging markets and developing economies. Even so, public opinion on this topic has not always been uniform. Quite often, opinion has become diverse and, at times, the desirability of foreign investment has been a contentious issue. Accordingly, there are individuals that have positive opinions of foreign investment while others do not. It is, therefore, unsurprising that a considerable number of prior studies have examined public opinion of foreign investment. What is surprising is that the socioeconomic characteristics and determents of public opinion have been greatly understudied. As such, there remain several open empirical questions that this paper addresses. More specifically, this work focuses on socio-economic determinants of public opinion on foreign investment using survey poll data from the Pew Research Center’s 2014 Global Attitudes Project, which surveyed individuals in 44 countries. In this survey, respondents reveal their views on the inflow of foreign investments in their country of residence by employing a scale that represents positive and negative attitudes. The nature of the data allows this topic to be examined using linear probability models, binomial probit and binomial logit techniques and the ordered logit estimation method. This paper establishes that individuals with higher educational attainment tend to have a positive attitude towards foreign investments; however, this attitude varies according to the level of economic and social development of their country of residence. Additionally, individual income is similarly related to public opinion, where wealthier individuals are more likely to express positive attitudes (again, however, with variation across economies). Besides the contributions of developing a better understanding of opinions towards foreign investment in an economic sense, this paper also considers sociological, psychological and political aspects, to the respective extents possible. Specifically, I have developed ann empirical model that is based on the previous literature regarding attitudes towards foreign investments. Using the Pew data, I have also constructed the variables and best corresponding econometric models to identify the socioeconomic determents of public opinion on foreign investment. Finally, by considering variation in the determinants of public opinion across advanced and developing economies, I provide important insights that are beneficial for several disciplines. . The resulting enhanced understanding of the socioeconomic determinants and individual preference towards foreign investments affords important insights into policymaking and economic and political disciplines.