Presentation Title

Construction and Testing of a Low-Cost Scanning Tunneling Microscope

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Surge 172

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Our goal is to create a low-cost Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) using commercial off the shelf materials and simple manufacturing techniques in order to increase the accessibility of STM. We have lowered the design cost dramatically by using a single low-cost piezoelectric stack for our microscope’s vertical tip motion, and an innovative magnetic design for the tip’s lateral movement that uses simple hand-wound solenoids and rare earth magnets arranged in a “magnetic cross” configuration. As part of our approach to make the design accessible, we have limited ourselves to using only hand tools and soldering in the construction. We have applied an iterative design approach to create soldering jigs that produce consistent and reproducible components for the STM structure. To test and parameterize our magnetic cross design, we have employed a Michelson interferometer with nanometer precision and data acquisition systems to measure the lateral tip displacement of our STM. As a result we were able to measure the trend of total lateral displacement versus changes in magnetic cross length and solenoid position. Now that we have verified the tip actuation system, our continuing research entails developing the circuitry, and writing the software to control the STM.

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Nov 12th, 10:45 AM Nov 12th, 11:00 AM

Construction and Testing of a Low-Cost Scanning Tunneling Microscope

Surge 172

Our goal is to create a low-cost Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) using commercial off the shelf materials and simple manufacturing techniques in order to increase the accessibility of STM. We have lowered the design cost dramatically by using a single low-cost piezoelectric stack for our microscope’s vertical tip motion, and an innovative magnetic design for the tip’s lateral movement that uses simple hand-wound solenoids and rare earth magnets arranged in a “magnetic cross” configuration. As part of our approach to make the design accessible, we have limited ourselves to using only hand tools and soldering in the construction. We have applied an iterative design approach to create soldering jigs that produce consistent and reproducible components for the STM structure. To test and parameterize our magnetic cross design, we have employed a Michelson interferometer with nanometer precision and data acquisition systems to measure the lateral tip displacement of our STM. As a result we were able to measure the trend of total lateral displacement versus changes in magnetic cross length and solenoid position. Now that we have verified the tip actuation system, our continuing research entails developing the circuitry, and writing the software to control the STM.