Presentation Title

Why Are We An Obese Nation? A Study of Gender Differences

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 269

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

According to the CDC, over one-third of adults in America are obese with figures continuing to rise. Although there is general agreement that obesity poses a health threat (e.g., heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and certain types of cancer), fundamental questions about the nature and scope of the pathological eating patterns in obesity are not fully known. The current ongoing study examines a wide range of psychological processes (i.e., cognitive restraint of eating; emotional eating; uncontrolled eating; problem-focused coping; emotion-focused coping; and self and others perception of body figure) as well as neurocognitive functioning (i.e., self-control and implicit preferences for fat or thin individuals) to determine the predictors of body mass index (BMI) in 86 female and 45 male university students. Participants’ psychological processes were assessed using the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, Brief COPE Scale, and Body Perception Scale, whereas neurocognition was measured using the Self-Control Scale and the Weight Implicit Association Test. For the female sample, a multiple regression analysis using a simultaneous procedure revealed that among the predictors, uncontrolled eating (B= -3.48; t= -2.07, p= 0.043), problem-focused coping (B= 0.11; t= 2.14, p= 0.036), and self-perception of body figure (B= 2.31; t= 5.28, p= 0.001) were the strongest determinants of BMI. For the male group, the regression analysis revealed that self-perception of body figure (B= 5.31; t= 3.65, p= 0.001) was a significant predictor of BMI, whereas problem-focused coping (B= 0.25; t= 1.89, p= 0.07) was at a trend-level. These preliminary findings implicate the importance of body perception, coping strategies, and uncontrolled eating in the study of obesity and pathological eating behaviors. Future treatment programs for maladaptive eating might benefit by targeting these specific aspects of psychological processes to reduce the rates of obesity.

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Nov 12th, 3:30 PM Nov 12th, 3:45 PM

Why Are We An Obese Nation? A Study of Gender Differences

HUB 269

According to the CDC, over one-third of adults in America are obese with figures continuing to rise. Although there is general agreement that obesity poses a health threat (e.g., heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and certain types of cancer), fundamental questions about the nature and scope of the pathological eating patterns in obesity are not fully known. The current ongoing study examines a wide range of psychological processes (i.e., cognitive restraint of eating; emotional eating; uncontrolled eating; problem-focused coping; emotion-focused coping; and self and others perception of body figure) as well as neurocognitive functioning (i.e., self-control and implicit preferences for fat or thin individuals) to determine the predictors of body mass index (BMI) in 86 female and 45 male university students. Participants’ psychological processes were assessed using the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, Brief COPE Scale, and Body Perception Scale, whereas neurocognition was measured using the Self-Control Scale and the Weight Implicit Association Test. For the female sample, a multiple regression analysis using a simultaneous procedure revealed that among the predictors, uncontrolled eating (B= -3.48; t= -2.07, p= 0.043), problem-focused coping (B= 0.11; t= 2.14, p= 0.036), and self-perception of body figure (B= 2.31; t= 5.28, p= 0.001) were the strongest determinants of BMI. For the male group, the regression analysis revealed that self-perception of body figure (B= 5.31; t= 3.65, p= 0.001) was a significant predictor of BMI, whereas problem-focused coping (B= 0.25; t= 1.89, p= 0.07) was at a trend-level. These preliminary findings implicate the importance of body perception, coping strategies, and uncontrolled eating in the study of obesity and pathological eating behaviors. Future treatment programs for maladaptive eating might benefit by targeting these specific aspects of psychological processes to reduce the rates of obesity.