Presentation Title

The Dark Triad: An Investigation of Neurocognition and Psychological Processes

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 269

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

The Dark Triad consists of three personality traits of Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy. Recent studies have shown that these traits could help to facilitate the achievement of short-term goals in social relationships. The current ongoing study compares 28 university students with traits of psychopathy and Machiavellianism (P/M) versus 37 students with traits of Narcissism (Narc) on aspects of neurocognitive (i.e., inhibition; self-control; and identifying emotional valence and emotional arousal) and psychological processes (i.e., self-deception and impression management). Participants’ personality traits were assessed using the Short Dark Triad questionnaire, whereas psychological processes were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. Neurocognitive functioning was measured using the Stop-it Inhibition Test, and Tangney Self-Control Scale. Participants also viewed a series of 21 positive, neutral, and negative images selected from the International Affective Picture System, and then identified emotional valence and arousal using the Self-Assessment Manikin. Interim analyses using a series of One-Way Analyses of Variance (ANOVAs) revealed a significant group effect for self-control, F (1, 63)=4.51, p <.038, Eta-squared =.07. Specifically, individuals who exhibited Narc personality traits had reported more self-control compared to those who displayed P/M traits. In addition, the two groups differed significantly on impression management (F(1,63)=5.63, p<.021, Eta-squared =.08) and self-deception (F(1,63)=7.30, p<.009, Eta-squared =.10), indicating that individuals with traits of Narc showed higher levels of impression management and self-deception compared to individuals with traits of P/M. However, the group effects for response inhibition (F (1, 63)=0.02, p= n.s.), aspects of emotional identification (F (1,63)=0.22, p=n.s.), and emotional arousal (F (1,63)=0.013, p=n.s.) were not statistically significant. Preliminary findings from this study could potentially expand our understanding of the specific roles of neurocognitive functioning and personality processes in individuals with the Dark Triad traits.

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Nov 12th, 2:30 PM Nov 12th, 2:45 PM

The Dark Triad: An Investigation of Neurocognition and Psychological Processes

HUB 269

The Dark Triad consists of three personality traits of Machiavellianism, narcissism, and psychopathy. Recent studies have shown that these traits could help to facilitate the achievement of short-term goals in social relationships. The current ongoing study compares 28 university students with traits of psychopathy and Machiavellianism (P/M) versus 37 students with traits of Narcissism (Narc) on aspects of neurocognitive (i.e., inhibition; self-control; and identifying emotional valence and emotional arousal) and psychological processes (i.e., self-deception and impression management). Participants’ personality traits were assessed using the Short Dark Triad questionnaire, whereas psychological processes were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. Neurocognitive functioning was measured using the Stop-it Inhibition Test, and Tangney Self-Control Scale. Participants also viewed a series of 21 positive, neutral, and negative images selected from the International Affective Picture System, and then identified emotional valence and arousal using the Self-Assessment Manikin. Interim analyses using a series of One-Way Analyses of Variance (ANOVAs) revealed a significant group effect for self-control, F (1, 63)=4.51, p <.038, Eta-squared =.07. Specifically, individuals who exhibited Narc personality traits had reported more self-control compared to those who displayed P/M traits. In addition, the two groups differed significantly on impression management (F(1,63)=5.63, p<.021, Eta-squared =.08) and self-deception (F(1,63)=7.30, p<.009, Eta-squared =.10), indicating that individuals with traits of Narc showed higher levels of impression management and self-deception compared to individuals with traits of P/M. However, the group effects for response inhibition (F (1, 63)=0.02, p= n.s.), aspects of emotional identification (F (1,63)=0.22, p=n.s.), and emotional arousal (F (1,63)=0.013, p=n.s.) were not statistically significant. Preliminary findings from this study could potentially expand our understanding of the specific roles of neurocognitive functioning and personality processes in individuals with the Dark Triad traits.