Presentation Title

Who’s at Risk for Internet Addiction? A Study of Gender and Cultural Differences

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Watkins 1117

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Fundamental questions about the nature and scope of internet addiction are currently not fully known. However, a few recent studies have reported that individuals with internet addiction would experience poorer self-esteem and less satisfaction with life. This ongoing study examines aspects of personality processes (i.e., self-esteem domains, attributed oppression, felt oppression, self-control, and life satisfaction) to determine the correlates of internet addiction in 96 university students (34 men and 62 women; 34 Hispanics/Latinos and 47 Caucasians). In addition, this study explores whether gender and culture explain the associations between personality processes and pathological internet use. Participants’ personality processes were measured using the State Self-Esteem Scale, Oppression Questionnaire, Tangney Self-Control Scale, and Satisfaction with Life Scale, whereas internet addiction was assessed using the Internet Addiction Test. For the female sample, poorer self-esteem (performance, social, and appearance) and lower levels of life satisfaction were significantly associated with problematic internet use, with the correlation coefficients ranging from -0.25 to -0.38 (p values = .026 to .003). Interestingly, for the male sample, higher scores on attributed oppression and felt oppression were significantly correlated with internet addiction (r= 0.405, p=0.018; r= 0.404, p=0.018, respectively). For cultural diversity, poorer performance esteem (r= -0.35, p=0.015) and social esteem (r= -0.34, p=0.019) were significantly correlated with internet addiction among Caucasian students, whereas poorer performance esteem (r= -0.36, p= 0.039) and lower levels of self-control (r= -0.38, p=0.047) were significantly associated with internet addiction among Hispanic/Latino students. Also, in the Hispanic/Latino sample, the results indicated that higher levels of attributed oppression and felt oppression were significantly correlated with internet addiction (r= 0.41, p=0.016; r= 0.37, p=0.031, respectively). Findings from this study could potentially expand our understanding of the links between specific aspects of personality processes and problematic internet use in university students with different gender and cultural/ethnic background.

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Nov 12th, 2:45 PM Nov 12th, 3:00 PM

Who’s at Risk for Internet Addiction? A Study of Gender and Cultural Differences

Watkins 1117

Fundamental questions about the nature and scope of internet addiction are currently not fully known. However, a few recent studies have reported that individuals with internet addiction would experience poorer self-esteem and less satisfaction with life. This ongoing study examines aspects of personality processes (i.e., self-esteem domains, attributed oppression, felt oppression, self-control, and life satisfaction) to determine the correlates of internet addiction in 96 university students (34 men and 62 women; 34 Hispanics/Latinos and 47 Caucasians). In addition, this study explores whether gender and culture explain the associations between personality processes and pathological internet use. Participants’ personality processes were measured using the State Self-Esteem Scale, Oppression Questionnaire, Tangney Self-Control Scale, and Satisfaction with Life Scale, whereas internet addiction was assessed using the Internet Addiction Test. For the female sample, poorer self-esteem (performance, social, and appearance) and lower levels of life satisfaction were significantly associated with problematic internet use, with the correlation coefficients ranging from -0.25 to -0.38 (p values = .026 to .003). Interestingly, for the male sample, higher scores on attributed oppression and felt oppression were significantly correlated with internet addiction (r= 0.405, p=0.018; r= 0.404, p=0.018, respectively). For cultural diversity, poorer performance esteem (r= -0.35, p=0.015) and social esteem (r= -0.34, p=0.019) were significantly correlated with internet addiction among Caucasian students, whereas poorer performance esteem (r= -0.36, p= 0.039) and lower levels of self-control (r= -0.38, p=0.047) were significantly associated with internet addiction among Hispanic/Latino students. Also, in the Hispanic/Latino sample, the results indicated that higher levels of attributed oppression and felt oppression were significantly correlated with internet addiction (r= 0.41, p=0.016; r= 0.37, p=0.031, respectively). Findings from this study could potentially expand our understanding of the links between specific aspects of personality processes and problematic internet use in university students with different gender and cultural/ethnic background.