Presentation Title

Drosophila’s Corn Source Attraction/ Avoidance

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Surge 173

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Organic foods have been shown in studies to be different than conventionally grown food in composition and in the well-being of organisms that eat them. Drosophila’s food preference will be observed to determine if there is a significant preference for organic corn over conventional corn when given exposure to both sources. A two way preference assay will be conducted with the choice of organic corn or a conventional corn source (VA, VB, or VC, all grown differently). After 15 minutes of exposure to both sources, flies will be declared to have chosen organic corn, a conventional corn, or undecided, being that they were not in either vial of medium. Collected data was statistically analyzed by using a preference and dispersal index to determine any significant trends in corn preference. Results showed no significant preference for one diet over the other in comparison to the control. This could be due in part from not taking a more direct approach on testing preference since flies were only observed once for a short amount of time.

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Nov 12th, 10:15 AM Nov 12th, 10:30 AM

Drosophila’s Corn Source Attraction/ Avoidance

Surge 173

Organic foods have been shown in studies to be different than conventionally grown food in composition and in the well-being of organisms that eat them. Drosophila’s food preference will be observed to determine if there is a significant preference for organic corn over conventional corn when given exposure to both sources. A two way preference assay will be conducted with the choice of organic corn or a conventional corn source (VA, VB, or VC, all grown differently). After 15 minutes of exposure to both sources, flies will be declared to have chosen organic corn, a conventional corn, or undecided, being that they were not in either vial of medium. Collected data was statistically analyzed by using a preference and dispersal index to determine any significant trends in corn preference. Results showed no significant preference for one diet over the other in comparison to the control. This could be due in part from not taking a more direct approach on testing preference since flies were only observed once for a short amount of time.