Presentation Title

The Natural Histroy of Stingray Injuries

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Surge 172

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Stingray Injuries are a hazard for any beachgoer. Stingrays are bottom-dwelling organisms that have a poisonous spine at the base, which has the capacity to release venom and inflict pain. Stingray related injuries are a common occurrence especially along the coast for beachgoers. We performed a prospective, observational study on the natural history of stingrays at Seal Beach, CA. Through two follow-up calls at one-week and one-month, we collected data on the participant's initial injury as well as treatment that occurred up to one month after the sting. Preliminary data shows that between July 2012 and March 2016, we enrolled 276 participants. Of the 276 participants, 225 (82%) of those completed a one-week follow-up interview and 191 (69%) of those also completed a one month follow-up. The most common location of sting was foot (76%), followed by the toe (16%), ankle (7%), and leg (1%). One participant did not report the sting’s location. Twenty-one percent of participants visited a physician regarding their injury. Of those participants, the nearly half visited their primary care physician (49%), and sixteen percent visited an emergency physician. Antibiotics were used to treat an infected wound in fourteen percent of enrollees, with Doxycycline being the most commonly used antibiotic. Fifty-nine percent of participants reported the pain had completely resolved by one week. In those reporting pain duration, the mean duration was twelve hours and the median was two hours. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication was the most common class of pain medication used.

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Nov 12th, 2:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:15 PM

The Natural Histroy of Stingray Injuries

Surge 172

Stingray Injuries are a hazard for any beachgoer. Stingrays are bottom-dwelling organisms that have a poisonous spine at the base, which has the capacity to release venom and inflict pain. Stingray related injuries are a common occurrence especially along the coast for beachgoers. We performed a prospective, observational study on the natural history of stingrays at Seal Beach, CA. Through two follow-up calls at one-week and one-month, we collected data on the participant's initial injury as well as treatment that occurred up to one month after the sting. Preliminary data shows that between July 2012 and March 2016, we enrolled 276 participants. Of the 276 participants, 225 (82%) of those completed a one-week follow-up interview and 191 (69%) of those also completed a one month follow-up. The most common location of sting was foot (76%), followed by the toe (16%), ankle (7%), and leg (1%). One participant did not report the sting’s location. Twenty-one percent of participants visited a physician regarding their injury. Of those participants, the nearly half visited their primary care physician (49%), and sixteen percent visited an emergency physician. Antibiotics were used to treat an infected wound in fourteen percent of enrollees, with Doxycycline being the most commonly used antibiotic. Fifty-nine percent of participants reported the pain had completely resolved by one week. In those reporting pain duration, the mean duration was twelve hours and the median was two hours. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication was the most common class of pain medication used.