Presentation Title

The Quarrel of Self-Identification

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 260

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

James Joyce uses patriarchal, material, ideological, nationalistic, and passivity to create a motif in how people attempt to deal with self-identification in his work of short stories, Dubliners. Eveline finds a man to leave Dublin with to take her from away from her oppressive father and “escape”, Lenehan uses clothes and attitude to cover make a name for himself, while Gabriel fails hold any values to discern what is real and what is not. The research presented delves into the decisions that these characters make and how it affects their lives for better or worse.

The most certain thing that is clear in Dubliners is that all of the characters identity was a part of the city whether they knew it or not. While Gabriel represents most of the problems with self-identifying, he also represents a possible future for someone who finally realizes the misconceptions of identity. This research presents actions and inaction's that these characters took because of their incomprehensible self-identification. Then the intricacies of Joyce’s particular choices of characters is observed, while the climax of why they all lead to Gabriel in the end in of “The Dead” is also examined.

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Nov 12th, 2:45 PM Nov 12th, 3:00 PM

The Quarrel of Self-Identification

HUB 260

James Joyce uses patriarchal, material, ideological, nationalistic, and passivity to create a motif in how people attempt to deal with self-identification in his work of short stories, Dubliners. Eveline finds a man to leave Dublin with to take her from away from her oppressive father and “escape”, Lenehan uses clothes and attitude to cover make a name for himself, while Gabriel fails hold any values to discern what is real and what is not. The research presented delves into the decisions that these characters make and how it affects their lives for better or worse.

The most certain thing that is clear in Dubliners is that all of the characters identity was a part of the city whether they knew it or not. While Gabriel represents most of the problems with self-identifying, he also represents a possible future for someone who finally realizes the misconceptions of identity. This research presents actions and inaction's that these characters took because of their incomprehensible self-identification. Then the intricacies of Joyce’s particular choices of characters is observed, while the climax of why they all lead to Gabriel in the end in of “The Dead” is also examined.