Presentation Title

Assembling and Improving upon a Prosthetic Hand using a 3D Printer

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Surge 171

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

3D printed prosthetic hands are less expensive and could achieve the same functions as a traditional prosthetic hand, but 3D printed hands have a difficult time at turning doorknobs and grasping smooth surfaced objects. There is not enough friction between the 3D printed hand and a smooth surfaced object because of the lack of palm lines, and the creases on both the palm and fingers. This led to our main goal which was to mirror the grip of the 3D printed hand to the grip of a real hand by determining the coefficient of static friction with different materials such as sandpaper, tire liner, grip liner, and sticky pads. We found that the grip liner had the highest coefficient of static friction by laying a block on a smooth table surface, and in between the table and the block we tested each of the three materials using a pulley at the end of the table. Weights were hung on the end of the string to test the friction of the material by measuring the weights until the block started moving. After doing this, we used the formula (mu)s=mh/mb, mb being the weight of the block and mh being the weight of the hanging mass, to determine the coefficient of static friction, (mu)s. After printing the hand, we assembled the prosthetic hand and applied grip liner to the fingers and palm while improvising because the hand did not print adequately. Once the hand was assembled it was clear that the hand would be more functional than before the material was applied because it was able to lift objects because of the friction created from the grip liners.

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Nov 12th, 11:00 AM Nov 12th, 11:15 AM

Assembling and Improving upon a Prosthetic Hand using a 3D Printer

Surge 171

3D printed prosthetic hands are less expensive and could achieve the same functions as a traditional prosthetic hand, but 3D printed hands have a difficult time at turning doorknobs and grasping smooth surfaced objects. There is not enough friction between the 3D printed hand and a smooth surfaced object because of the lack of palm lines, and the creases on both the palm and fingers. This led to our main goal which was to mirror the grip of the 3D printed hand to the grip of a real hand by determining the coefficient of static friction with different materials such as sandpaper, tire liner, grip liner, and sticky pads. We found that the grip liner had the highest coefficient of static friction by laying a block on a smooth table surface, and in between the table and the block we tested each of the three materials using a pulley at the end of the table. Weights were hung on the end of the string to test the friction of the material by measuring the weights until the block started moving. After doing this, we used the formula (mu)s=mh/mb, mb being the weight of the block and mh being the weight of the hanging mass, to determine the coefficient of static friction, (mu)s. After printing the hand, we assembled the prosthetic hand and applied grip liner to the fingers and palm while improvising because the hand did not print adequately. Once the hand was assembled it was clear that the hand would be more functional than before the material was applied because it was able to lift objects because of the friction created from the grip liners.