Presentation Title

Development of Earth Abundant Molecular Catalysts

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 268

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Development of new catalysts for chemical transformations using earth abundant transition metals is of particular interest. Many industrial catalyst rely on toxic, rare and expensive metals such as such as platinum, ruthenium, and rhodium. The development of cost efficient, metal catalysts made with earth abundant metals could pave the way for more sustainable chemistry and potentially harness new reactivity. Our research investigates applications of 3d transition metals in polymerization reactions. Specifically, we are studying bidentate N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC2) ligands because no vanadium NHC2 complexes have been reported, despite monodentate NHC vanadium complexes being known. Vanadium catalysts containing bidentate NHC ligands may offer greater flexibility and stability at extreme temperatures with added polymer control than existing monodentate NHC catalysts. Our results demonstrate the ability for vanadium to bind to NHC2 ligands and present a new possibility for catalyst design.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 2:15 PM Nov 12th, 2:30 PM

Development of Earth Abundant Molecular Catalysts

HUB 268

Development of new catalysts for chemical transformations using earth abundant transition metals is of particular interest. Many industrial catalyst rely on toxic, rare and expensive metals such as such as platinum, ruthenium, and rhodium. The development of cost efficient, metal catalysts made with earth abundant metals could pave the way for more sustainable chemistry and potentially harness new reactivity. Our research investigates applications of 3d transition metals in polymerization reactions. Specifically, we are studying bidentate N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC2) ligands because no vanadium NHC2 complexes have been reported, despite monodentate NHC vanadium complexes being known. Vanadium catalysts containing bidentate NHC ligands may offer greater flexibility and stability at extreme temperatures with added polymer control than existing monodentate NHC catalysts. Our results demonstrate the ability for vanadium to bind to NHC2 ligands and present a new possibility for catalyst design.