Presentation Title

Porte-Cochere Crusader: A Valet’s Holy War on McDonaldization in a Grand Hotel

Presenter Information

Alexandra C. Vignau Ms.Follow

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Watkins 1117

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

The hospitality industry abides by a set of standards designed to provide personalized luxury to its clientele seemingly antithetical to customer’s desires. The expectation of making personalized luxury fast and identical, while flawless, forces the hotel into the gridlock of the iron cage, doomed to consistently fail at delivering contradictory service; thus, forcing employees to accommodate luxury fast food style.

Lashley, Lynch, & Morrison (2007 cited Ritzer 1983, p.131) assert that McDonaldization can expand the hospitality industry’s standard of operation and at the same time threatens the industry’s product base. I propose that if the four pillars of McDonaldization: control, predictability, calculability, and efficiency (Ritzer 1983) are not implemented at the Park Hyatt Aviara Resort, guests will have a negative or null five star-five diamond experience.

From my participant observer perspective, as a valet, I developed the procedure and mechanism to collect the data from guest interactions over the course of two years. Medallia surveys were analyzed using a keyword system, matched to corresponding customer incident reports, and compared against Forbes Five Star and AAA Five Diamond industry standards to quantify clientele feedback. Of the four pillars of McDonaldization, the results showed calculability negatively influenced guest experiences the most. These results disprove the hypothesis, indicating that guests expect the grandeur of the five star-five diamond brand with the same level of expectation in regards to the customer satisfaction that McDonaldization provides. If luxury hospitality further incorporates McDonaldization into its service standard the integrity of this specialized industry will no longer exist.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 3:00 PM Nov 12th, 3:15 PM

Porte-Cochere Crusader: A Valet’s Holy War on McDonaldization in a Grand Hotel

Watkins 1117

The hospitality industry abides by a set of standards designed to provide personalized luxury to its clientele seemingly antithetical to customer’s desires. The expectation of making personalized luxury fast and identical, while flawless, forces the hotel into the gridlock of the iron cage, doomed to consistently fail at delivering contradictory service; thus, forcing employees to accommodate luxury fast food style.

Lashley, Lynch, & Morrison (2007 cited Ritzer 1983, p.131) assert that McDonaldization can expand the hospitality industry’s standard of operation and at the same time threatens the industry’s product base. I propose that if the four pillars of McDonaldization: control, predictability, calculability, and efficiency (Ritzer 1983) are not implemented at the Park Hyatt Aviara Resort, guests will have a negative or null five star-five diamond experience.

From my participant observer perspective, as a valet, I developed the procedure and mechanism to collect the data from guest interactions over the course of two years. Medallia surveys were analyzed using a keyword system, matched to corresponding customer incident reports, and compared against Forbes Five Star and AAA Five Diamond industry standards to quantify clientele feedback. Of the four pillars of McDonaldization, the results showed calculability negatively influenced guest experiences the most. These results disprove the hypothesis, indicating that guests expect the grandeur of the five star-five diamond brand with the same level of expectation in regards to the customer satisfaction that McDonaldization provides. If luxury hospitality further incorporates McDonaldization into its service standard the integrity of this specialized industry will no longer exist.