Presentation Title

Reflections

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Watkins 1117

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

This presentation features my original story, entitled “Reflections.” This story is a little unconventional – it consists of an introduction, eight small paragraphs or reflections, and an epilogue. It is a collection of personal and fictional memories, thoughts, and images. The paragraphs are numbered, which serves only to differentiate between the separate pieces and is not necessarily indicative of any priority or meaning itself.
“Reflections” doesn’t have a definite plotline, start, climax, or end, per se. Instead, each paragraph is a little vignette or a small piece of literature on its own. However, at the same time, the paragraphs are subtly connected, sharing and exchanging deeper ideas. The main topics they explore include death, life, time, nature, and the sense of self – all from a personal point of view. The story has an almost surrealist direction, so the ideas are not always laid out plainly, allowing for reader response and interpretations.
“Reflections” is directed towards a wide range of audiences. Using personal impressions and approaches, it conveys universal ideas and struggles that most human beings go through, one way or another.
The purpose of the story as a whole is to present the intimate world of an individual while also giving the audience the opportunity to explore their own views and thoughts.

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Nov 12th, 10:45 AM Nov 12th, 11:00 AM

Reflections

Watkins 1117

This presentation features my original story, entitled “Reflections.” This story is a little unconventional – it consists of an introduction, eight small paragraphs or reflections, and an epilogue. It is a collection of personal and fictional memories, thoughts, and images. The paragraphs are numbered, which serves only to differentiate between the separate pieces and is not necessarily indicative of any priority or meaning itself.
“Reflections” doesn’t have a definite plotline, start, climax, or end, per se. Instead, each paragraph is a little vignette or a small piece of literature on its own. However, at the same time, the paragraphs are subtly connected, sharing and exchanging deeper ideas. The main topics they explore include death, life, time, nature, and the sense of self – all from a personal point of view. The story has an almost surrealist direction, so the ideas are not always laid out plainly, allowing for reader response and interpretations.
“Reflections” is directed towards a wide range of audiences. Using personal impressions and approaches, it conveys universal ideas and struggles that most human beings go through, one way or another.
The purpose of the story as a whole is to present the intimate world of an individual while also giving the audience the opportunity to explore their own views and thoughts.