Presentation Title

Parametric coupling between two macroscopic quantum resonators, a scheme for controlling quantum states.

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 379

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Macroscopic quantum resonators (MQRs) are large enough to be considered bulk material, but small enough that they are able to access quantum mechanical states, thus MQRs bridge the gap between quantum mechanics and classical mechanics. Furthermore, MQRs can be: fabricated using common etching and lithographic techniques, used to make high-Q harmonic oscillator networks, and used for quantum information processing. For these reasons, MQRs are the focus of our research. Specifically, we present a time-dependent linear coupling scheme for MQRs that can be used to generate quantum features like entanglement and squeezed states. Using logarithmic negativity, we are able to quantify entanglement of the system at finite temperatures. We examine our scheme on two such systems, the first is composed of a nanomechanical resonator and superconducting electrical resonator, the second is composed of Two superconducting lumped-element electrical resonators.

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Nov 12th, 3:00 PM Nov 12th, 3:15 PM

Parametric coupling between two macroscopic quantum resonators, a scheme for controlling quantum states.

HUB 379

Macroscopic quantum resonators (MQRs) are large enough to be considered bulk material, but small enough that they are able to access quantum mechanical states, thus MQRs bridge the gap between quantum mechanics and classical mechanics. Furthermore, MQRs can be: fabricated using common etching and lithographic techniques, used to make high-Q harmonic oscillator networks, and used for quantum information processing. For these reasons, MQRs are the focus of our research. Specifically, we present a time-dependent linear coupling scheme for MQRs that can be used to generate quantum features like entanglement and squeezed states. Using logarithmic negativity, we are able to quantify entanglement of the system at finite temperatures. We examine our scheme on two such systems, the first is composed of a nanomechanical resonator and superconducting electrical resonator, the second is composed of Two superconducting lumped-element electrical resonators.