Presentation Title

The Human Need for Leaders

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Watkins 2141

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Throughout history, various leaders have risen to power: Some were loved, others hated. The recurring theme of one person, or a group of people commanding the majority has been a human tradition passed down for thousands of years throughout the ages of civilization. The ancient Greeks believed that the leader should be chosen at random by a ballot box of names in order for the government to be fully representative. The Romans believed that their leaders should be voted for by their own citizens. Regardless of their differing beliefs, both the Greeks and the Romans created structures of government in which it was the role of the leader to watch over their people. This type of leader, including kings, queens, emperors, empresses, sultans, czars, presidents, and dictators, has been established by humans since the beginning of recorded history. Humans have been conditioned to believe that a leader is necessary to represent them as a collective. The presence of a leader in society is so ubiquitous that it seems that leaders are created almost instinctually and are part of the human psyche, in order to have a single entity represent humans as a whole. The purpose of this research is to support the argument that historical analysis shows that a leading figure is needed to help keep society stable — in other words, help people integrate into a society where people can grow, thrive, and evolve through the creation of economy, culture, and education.

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Nov 12th, 2:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:15 PM

The Human Need for Leaders

Watkins 2141

Throughout history, various leaders have risen to power: Some were loved, others hated. The recurring theme of one person, or a group of people commanding the majority has been a human tradition passed down for thousands of years throughout the ages of civilization. The ancient Greeks believed that the leader should be chosen at random by a ballot box of names in order for the government to be fully representative. The Romans believed that their leaders should be voted for by their own citizens. Regardless of their differing beliefs, both the Greeks and the Romans created structures of government in which it was the role of the leader to watch over their people. This type of leader, including kings, queens, emperors, empresses, sultans, czars, presidents, and dictators, has been established by humans since the beginning of recorded history. Humans have been conditioned to believe that a leader is necessary to represent them as a collective. The presence of a leader in society is so ubiquitous that it seems that leaders are created almost instinctually and are part of the human psyche, in order to have a single entity represent humans as a whole. The purpose of this research is to support the argument that historical analysis shows that a leading figure is needed to help keep society stable — in other words, help people integrate into a society where people can grow, thrive, and evolve through the creation of economy, culture, and education.