Presentation Title

Virus-mimicking Hybrid Nanostructures Composed of Indocyanine Green and Bovine Serum Albumin for Near Infra-Red Fluorescence Imaging of Ovarian Cancer Cells

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Watkins 2141

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Ovarian cancer remains as the dominant cause of death, due to malignancies in the female reproductive system. The capability to identify and remove all tumors during intraoperative procedures may ultimately prevent cancer recurrence and improve patient survival. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of optically active hybrid nanostructures for enhanced near infra-red (NIR) fluorescence imaging of ovarian cancer cells. We have engineered a hybrid nanostructure composed of genome-depleted plant-infecting brome mosaic virus (BMV) doped with an FDA approved NIR chromophore, indocyanine green (ICG) complexed with bovine serum albumin (BSA). We refer these hybrid nanostructures as ICG-BSA loaded optical viral ghosts (BOVGs). The photophysical properties of BOVGs were characterized by using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The mean peak value of BOVGs with a hydrodynamic diameter was estimated using dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements is ~28 nm. Using SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells, we further demonstrate the utility of virus mimicking hybrid nanostructures for enhanced intracellular NIR fluorescence imaging, after 2 hrs of incubation time. The BOVGs exhibit ~3.0 times higher NIR fluorescence intensities when compared to that of OVGs (without BSA) and free ICG. Overall, virus mimicking hybrid nanostructures may serve as a potentially nontoxic and multifunctional nanoplatform for future phototheranostic applications.

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Nov 12th, 10:15 AM Nov 12th, 10:30 AM

Virus-mimicking Hybrid Nanostructures Composed of Indocyanine Green and Bovine Serum Albumin for Near Infra-Red Fluorescence Imaging of Ovarian Cancer Cells

Watkins 2141

Ovarian cancer remains as the dominant cause of death, due to malignancies in the female reproductive system. The capability to identify and remove all tumors during intraoperative procedures may ultimately prevent cancer recurrence and improve patient survival. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of optically active hybrid nanostructures for enhanced near infra-red (NIR) fluorescence imaging of ovarian cancer cells. We have engineered a hybrid nanostructure composed of genome-depleted plant-infecting brome mosaic virus (BMV) doped with an FDA approved NIR chromophore, indocyanine green (ICG) complexed with bovine serum albumin (BSA). We refer these hybrid nanostructures as ICG-BSA loaded optical viral ghosts (BOVGs). The photophysical properties of BOVGs were characterized by using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The mean peak value of BOVGs with a hydrodynamic diameter was estimated using dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements is ~28 nm. Using SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells, we further demonstrate the utility of virus mimicking hybrid nanostructures for enhanced intracellular NIR fluorescence imaging, after 2 hrs of incubation time. The BOVGs exhibit ~3.0 times higher NIR fluorescence intensities when compared to that of OVGs (without BSA) and free ICG. Overall, virus mimicking hybrid nanostructures may serve as a potentially nontoxic and multifunctional nanoplatform for future phototheranostic applications.