Presentation Title

Evaluation of Urinalysis Efficacy in Diagnosing Adult Male Patients Presenting with Abdominal Pain in the Emergency Department.

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Surge 172

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Urinalysis is a test examining the content, concentration, and appearance of one’s urine. It is generally used to diagnose urinary tract infections and kidney diseases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of urinalysis in diagnosing adult male patients who are presented to the emergency department with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Subjects are screened by emergency medicine research associates in the UC Irvine medical center’s emergency department and approached for consent. Once enrolled in the study, their treating physician fills out a survey at three different times: before seeing the patient, after seeing the patient, and after seeing the urinalysis results and assesses the efficacy of the test in diagnosing the patient. The assessment is based on a scale ranging from 1-5, where 1 and 2 are not helpful, 3 is neither helpful nor unhelpful, and 4 and 5 are very helpful. Based on the available data collected so far, the physicians stated that urinalysis was not helpful before seeing the patient (23.5%), after seeing the patient (45.1%), and after seeing the results of the urinalysis (45.1%). According to physicians' comments, in most cases, urinalysis is ordered as part of a diagnostic work up and not based on necessity. The results are preliminary, however, it could potentially decrease the overall number of urinalysis ordered as part of a diagnostic work up, which would not only prevent unnecessary expenses but also false positives that could possibly lead to expensive and invasive diagnostic evaluations.

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Nov 12th, 3:15 PM Nov 12th, 3:30 PM

Evaluation of Urinalysis Efficacy in Diagnosing Adult Male Patients Presenting with Abdominal Pain in the Emergency Department.

Surge 172

Urinalysis is a test examining the content, concentration, and appearance of one’s urine. It is generally used to diagnose urinary tract infections and kidney diseases. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of urinalysis in diagnosing adult male patients who are presented to the emergency department with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Subjects are screened by emergency medicine research associates in the UC Irvine medical center’s emergency department and approached for consent. Once enrolled in the study, their treating physician fills out a survey at three different times: before seeing the patient, after seeing the patient, and after seeing the urinalysis results and assesses the efficacy of the test in diagnosing the patient. The assessment is based on a scale ranging from 1-5, where 1 and 2 are not helpful, 3 is neither helpful nor unhelpful, and 4 and 5 are very helpful. Based on the available data collected so far, the physicians stated that urinalysis was not helpful before seeing the patient (23.5%), after seeing the patient (45.1%), and after seeing the results of the urinalysis (45.1%). According to physicians' comments, in most cases, urinalysis is ordered as part of a diagnostic work up and not based on necessity. The results are preliminary, however, it could potentially decrease the overall number of urinalysis ordered as part of a diagnostic work up, which would not only prevent unnecessary expenses but also false positives that could possibly lead to expensive and invasive diagnostic evaluations.