Presentation Title

The Search for Identity

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

MSE 011

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Latinos. We are each individually unique human beings. But what does this mean?

It is said that Mexican identity begins in the Mexican Revolution of 1910, which gave rise to a cultural renaissance of the arts during an unstable time for the country. However, Mexican selfhood also extends back to its indigenous heritage because it is a part of history that has evolved and remained alive within its people. The majority of the Latino community in the United States today, especially in the Southwest, is from Mexico, but many people also come from different countries in Central America and South America combined. So, part of what being Latino or Latina means is “mestizaje,” mixed identity, which may ultimately represent what José Vasconcelos called the raza cosmica (the cosmic race).

The U.S. is a melting pot, full of many cultures united through language. Tacos make up a large part of our culture, but that is just the beginning of the story. Mexican cuisine is so diverse and helps us explain Mexican identity because it is embedded within our very nature. This includes questions of indignity, which was overlooked and often complicated. Everyone has identity that is connected in some way or another to food, and this helps us better understand whether the formation of Mexican identity is constructed partly through food. For instance, food that is thought to be Mexican in the United States is not considered as authentic Mexican food for Mexicans. Why is this the case? And why is it that sometimes Mexicans are seen as Americans in their own country, but as Mexicans in the United States?

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Nov 12th, 10:30 AM Nov 12th, 10:45 AM

The Search for Identity

MSE 011

Latinos. We are each individually unique human beings. But what does this mean?

It is said that Mexican identity begins in the Mexican Revolution of 1910, which gave rise to a cultural renaissance of the arts during an unstable time for the country. However, Mexican selfhood also extends back to its indigenous heritage because it is a part of history that has evolved and remained alive within its people. The majority of the Latino community in the United States today, especially in the Southwest, is from Mexico, but many people also come from different countries in Central America and South America combined. So, part of what being Latino or Latina means is “mestizaje,” mixed identity, which may ultimately represent what José Vasconcelos called the raza cosmica (the cosmic race).

The U.S. is a melting pot, full of many cultures united through language. Tacos make up a large part of our culture, but that is just the beginning of the story. Mexican cuisine is so diverse and helps us explain Mexican identity because it is embedded within our very nature. This includes questions of indignity, which was overlooked and often complicated. Everyone has identity that is connected in some way or another to food, and this helps us better understand whether the formation of Mexican identity is constructed partly through food. For instance, food that is thought to be Mexican in the United States is not considered as authentic Mexican food for Mexicans. Why is this the case? And why is it that sometimes Mexicans are seen as Americans in their own country, but as Mexicans in the United States?