Presentation Title

Association between self-esteem and mindset toward social stress

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 355

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Association between self-esteem and mindset toward social stress

Author: Alisha T. Ginsberg

Mentor: Máire B. Ford, Ph.D., Loyola Marymount University

Studies have shown that individuals who experience lower levels of self-esteem are more vulnerable to the negative effects of social stress on health and well-being when compared to individuals with higher levels of self-esteem. Social stress is stress that stems from events within relationships with others. An example of social stress is interpersonal rejection, where one individual chooses not to socialize with another. Given that the way in which people view stress (e.g., their mindset toward stress) can shape their perceptions of and responses to stress we hypothesized that mindset might help to explain the association between self-esteem and responses to a specific type of stress, namely social stress. Specifically, we wanted to see if those with low self-esteem tended to view social stress through a fixed mindset (i.e., viewing social stress as a negative event that should be avoided and viewing their own ability to handle social stress as fixed or unchanging and therefore impossible to improve upon). As a first step toward achieving this goal we conducted a questionnaire study investigating the association between self-esteem and mindset toward social stress, and collected data from approximately 200 participants. Our results show that high self-esteem is associated with a growth mindset, and low self-esteem is associated with more of a fixed mindset. These findings contribute to our understanding of why those with low self-esteem fare more poorly in the face of social stress.

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Nov 12th, 3:15 PM Nov 12th, 3:30 PM

Association between self-esteem and mindset toward social stress

HUB 355

Association between self-esteem and mindset toward social stress

Author: Alisha T. Ginsberg

Mentor: Máire B. Ford, Ph.D., Loyola Marymount University

Studies have shown that individuals who experience lower levels of self-esteem are more vulnerable to the negative effects of social stress on health and well-being when compared to individuals with higher levels of self-esteem. Social stress is stress that stems from events within relationships with others. An example of social stress is interpersonal rejection, where one individual chooses not to socialize with another. Given that the way in which people view stress (e.g., their mindset toward stress) can shape their perceptions of and responses to stress we hypothesized that mindset might help to explain the association between self-esteem and responses to a specific type of stress, namely social stress. Specifically, we wanted to see if those with low self-esteem tended to view social stress through a fixed mindset (i.e., viewing social stress as a negative event that should be avoided and viewing their own ability to handle social stress as fixed or unchanging and therefore impossible to improve upon). As a first step toward achieving this goal we conducted a questionnaire study investigating the association between self-esteem and mindset toward social stress, and collected data from approximately 200 participants. Our results show that high self-esteem is associated with a growth mindset, and low self-esteem is associated with more of a fixed mindset. These findings contribute to our understanding of why those with low self-esteem fare more poorly in the face of social stress.