Presentation Title

School Earthquake Safety Initiative: Implementing Earthquake Engineering in High School Physics

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Watkins 2141

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

School Earthquake Safety Initiative (SESI) developed by the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) aims to increase awareness about earthquake engineering by having experts collaborate in different aspects. The purpose of the Classroom and Education Outreach committee is to create a dialog about school earthquake safety within the community and create leaders in science and public safety.

As of 1996 the average school building in western U.S. was approximately 40 years. With an increasing population, in San Diego alone 1 in 5 classrooms is a bungalow. California has never experienced an earthquake of magnitude 6.0 or greater during school hours. Schools are often used as emergency shelters; however, schools do not meet shelter seismic building codes. To increase the understanding of earthquake engineering a curriculum was developed in correlation to high school physics Next Generation Science Standards.

Preliminary use of the curriculum demonstrates that age appropriate earthquake engineering material is possible to create. This curriculum and teaching techniques were applied to students in the California State Summer School for Mathematics and Science (COSMOS) for high school students and pilots were run in schools in the San Diego Unified School District.

Preliminary results of student surveys demonstrated that approximately 60% saw a 25%-50% correlation between physics and the lectures in the curriculum. Teachers participating in the project had a very positive outlook on the curriculum, 100% stated their students were challenged by the curriculum, would be interested in conducting the design project on their own and requested additional material to facilitate teaching design concepts. Over 50% stated lectures were engaging, but needed a more explicit correlation to physics concepts taught in class. Future research consists of assessing results of more pilots, improving curriculum, developing additional optional material for teachers to use, and dissipate curriculum.

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Nov 12th, 2:30 PM Nov 12th, 2:45 PM

School Earthquake Safety Initiative: Implementing Earthquake Engineering in High School Physics

Watkins 2141

School Earthquake Safety Initiative (SESI) developed by the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) aims to increase awareness about earthquake engineering by having experts collaborate in different aspects. The purpose of the Classroom and Education Outreach committee is to create a dialog about school earthquake safety within the community and create leaders in science and public safety.

As of 1996 the average school building in western U.S. was approximately 40 years. With an increasing population, in San Diego alone 1 in 5 classrooms is a bungalow. California has never experienced an earthquake of magnitude 6.0 or greater during school hours. Schools are often used as emergency shelters; however, schools do not meet shelter seismic building codes. To increase the understanding of earthquake engineering a curriculum was developed in correlation to high school physics Next Generation Science Standards.

Preliminary use of the curriculum demonstrates that age appropriate earthquake engineering material is possible to create. This curriculum and teaching techniques were applied to students in the California State Summer School for Mathematics and Science (COSMOS) for high school students and pilots were run in schools in the San Diego Unified School District.

Preliminary results of student surveys demonstrated that approximately 60% saw a 25%-50% correlation between physics and the lectures in the curriculum. Teachers participating in the project had a very positive outlook on the curriculum, 100% stated their students were challenged by the curriculum, would be interested in conducting the design project on their own and requested additional material to facilitate teaching design concepts. Over 50% stated lectures were engaging, but needed a more explicit correlation to physics concepts taught in class. Future research consists of assessing results of more pilots, improving curriculum, developing additional optional material for teachers to use, and dissipate curriculum.