Presentation Title

When in Doubt, Hope

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 367

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

When In Doubt, Hope

Alanna Dantona, California State University Channel Islands

Mentor: Virgil H. Adams III, Ph.D.

Psychology Program,

California State University Channel Islands

Abstract

Hope has been identified as a component of motivation that involves the ability to plan and execute pathways to success. It has been found to be a mediating factor between the pursuit of goals in the face of adversity and life satisfaction (Smedema, Chan, & Phillips, 2014). It has also been identified as beneficial when used therapeutically to optimize coping strategies and improve overall quality of life for those who are mentally or physically ill (Thornton et al., 2014). The following study was developed from this philosophy and examines how the agency and pathway thinking involved in hope help to predict global well-being. A sample of California residents (n = 1,463) completed the Quality of Life Survey and data collected was submitted to a linear regression for analysis. It was hypothesized that those with a higher aptitude for using agency and pathway thinking were more likely to report satisfaction with their choices and lives. The results revealed that hopeful thinking does, in fact, impact overall well-being, particularly when controlling for age, gender, income, education, and marital status. The results suggest that those who use agency and pathway thinking are more likely to pursue challenging, but realistic goals and ultimately achieve greater levels of happiness. The implications of the study are applied to Snyder’s Hope Theory (2002) in order to understand the role of using hopeful thinking in the context of maintaining mental as well as physical health.

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Nov 12th, 3:45 PM Nov 12th, 4:00 PM

When in Doubt, Hope

HUB 367

When In Doubt, Hope

Alanna Dantona, California State University Channel Islands

Mentor: Virgil H. Adams III, Ph.D.

Psychology Program,

California State University Channel Islands

Abstract

Hope has been identified as a component of motivation that involves the ability to plan and execute pathways to success. It has been found to be a mediating factor between the pursuit of goals in the face of adversity and life satisfaction (Smedema, Chan, & Phillips, 2014). It has also been identified as beneficial when used therapeutically to optimize coping strategies and improve overall quality of life for those who are mentally or physically ill (Thornton et al., 2014). The following study was developed from this philosophy and examines how the agency and pathway thinking involved in hope help to predict global well-being. A sample of California residents (n = 1,463) completed the Quality of Life Survey and data collected was submitted to a linear regression for analysis. It was hypothesized that those with a higher aptitude for using agency and pathway thinking were more likely to report satisfaction with their choices and lives. The results revealed that hopeful thinking does, in fact, impact overall well-being, particularly when controlling for age, gender, income, education, and marital status. The results suggest that those who use agency and pathway thinking are more likely to pursue challenging, but realistic goals and ultimately achieve greater levels of happiness. The implications of the study are applied to Snyder’s Hope Theory (2002) in order to understand the role of using hopeful thinking in the context of maintaining mental as well as physical health.