Presentation Title

The Psychological Impact of Stress

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 355

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

The Psychological Impact of Stress
Katey Marin, California State University Channel Islands
Mentor: Virgil H. Adams III, Ph.D.
Psychology Program
California State University Channel Islands

Positive personality features (optimism, hope, and happiness) can be predictors in how one copes when faced with psychological distress, such as perceived stress, depression, and anxiety (Besser & Ziegler-Hill, 2014). However, other research argues that the more individuals perceive stress in their lives can be indicative of poor adjustment to coping with life stresses, thus hindering the individual’s self-esteem, mental well-being, and hope for the future (Srivastava & Kiran, 2015). This current study examines the relationship between perceived stress, global well-being, self-esteem, and hope. Participants were accumulated from adults within Southern California communities (n=857). Each variable was measured by items from Rosenburg’s (2001) self-esteem, Snyder’s (1991) hope, Cohen’s (1983) stress, and Andrew and Withey’s (1976) wellbeing scales. It was hypothesized that low self-esteem would be associated with higher levels of hope, self-esteem, and mental well-being. In accordance with our hypothesis, we found statistical evidence to support a moderate negative effect for self-esteem and mental well-being as the two main independent variables relating to lower levels of stress. Interestingly, these results remained after controlling for age, gender, income, education, and marital status. Discussion focuses on individuals’ self-esteem and global wellbeing in relationship with our perceived stress.

keywords: stress, self-esteem, hope, mental-wellbeing

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Nov 12th, 3:30 PM Nov 12th, 3:45 PM

The Psychological Impact of Stress

HUB 355

The Psychological Impact of Stress
Katey Marin, California State University Channel Islands
Mentor: Virgil H. Adams III, Ph.D.
Psychology Program
California State University Channel Islands

Positive personality features (optimism, hope, and happiness) can be predictors in how one copes when faced with psychological distress, such as perceived stress, depression, and anxiety (Besser & Ziegler-Hill, 2014). However, other research argues that the more individuals perceive stress in their lives can be indicative of poor adjustment to coping with life stresses, thus hindering the individual’s self-esteem, mental well-being, and hope for the future (Srivastava & Kiran, 2015). This current study examines the relationship between perceived stress, global well-being, self-esteem, and hope. Participants were accumulated from adults within Southern California communities (n=857). Each variable was measured by items from Rosenburg’s (2001) self-esteem, Snyder’s (1991) hope, Cohen’s (1983) stress, and Andrew and Withey’s (1976) wellbeing scales. It was hypothesized that low self-esteem would be associated with higher levels of hope, self-esteem, and mental well-being. In accordance with our hypothesis, we found statistical evidence to support a moderate negative effect for self-esteem and mental well-being as the two main independent variables relating to lower levels of stress. Interestingly, these results remained after controlling for age, gender, income, education, and marital status. Discussion focuses on individuals’ self-esteem and global wellbeing in relationship with our perceived stress.

keywords: stress, self-esteem, hope, mental-wellbeing