Presentation Title

Trust Within Others: The Impact of Stress, Self-Esteem, and Hope

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Watkins 1117

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Trust Within Others: The Impact of Stress, Self-Esteem, and Hope

Kelley Kingsley, California State University Channel Islands

Mentor: Virgil H. Adams III, Ph.D.

Psychology Program,

California State University Channel Islands

Dyadic trust refers to the ability and amount of belief that a person has regarding another to be honest and act with intentions of goodwill (Larzelere & Huston, 1980). How one acquires the ability to trust varies across situations. Some have concluded that individual self-esteem has a significant positive effect on trust between romantic partners for both genders (Butler, 1986). Similarly, others have determined that an increase in the willingness to trust is accounted for by higher self-esteem due to confidence in one’s ability to handle said trust potentially being violated (Weining & Smith, 2012). Furthermore, interpersonal trust has been accounted for as a coping mechanism in social relationships during stressful events (Koranyi & Rothermund, 2010). The present study expands on this research by examining if hope, stress, and self-esteem account for the variance in trust beyond that associated with age, gender, education, marital status and household income. Variables of trust were measured using the Dyadic Trust Scale (Larzelere & Huston, 1980). Utilizing a sample of adults collected from Southern California (n=567), it was hypothesized that people who believe in themselves with a high self-esteem and under less stress will be able to trust more. Results supported this in that our respondents who reported less stress had higher levels of trust and those with reported higher self-esteem also had higher levels of trust. Hope was insignificant in our findings. It is important to note, these findings remain valid after accounting for the variance in age, gender, education, marital status and household income. The discussion focuses on people’s overall dyadic trust in relation to believing in one’s self and stressful situations.

keywords: trust, stress, self-esteem, hope

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Nov 12th, 3:15 PM Nov 12th, 3:30 PM

Trust Within Others: The Impact of Stress, Self-Esteem, and Hope

Watkins 1117

Trust Within Others: The Impact of Stress, Self-Esteem, and Hope

Kelley Kingsley, California State University Channel Islands

Mentor: Virgil H. Adams III, Ph.D.

Psychology Program,

California State University Channel Islands

Dyadic trust refers to the ability and amount of belief that a person has regarding another to be honest and act with intentions of goodwill (Larzelere & Huston, 1980). How one acquires the ability to trust varies across situations. Some have concluded that individual self-esteem has a significant positive effect on trust between romantic partners for both genders (Butler, 1986). Similarly, others have determined that an increase in the willingness to trust is accounted for by higher self-esteem due to confidence in one’s ability to handle said trust potentially being violated (Weining & Smith, 2012). Furthermore, interpersonal trust has been accounted for as a coping mechanism in social relationships during stressful events (Koranyi & Rothermund, 2010). The present study expands on this research by examining if hope, stress, and self-esteem account for the variance in trust beyond that associated with age, gender, education, marital status and household income. Variables of trust were measured using the Dyadic Trust Scale (Larzelere & Huston, 1980). Utilizing a sample of adults collected from Southern California (n=567), it was hypothesized that people who believe in themselves with a high self-esteem and under less stress will be able to trust more. Results supported this in that our respondents who reported less stress had higher levels of trust and those with reported higher self-esteem also had higher levels of trust. Hope was insignificant in our findings. It is important to note, these findings remain valid after accounting for the variance in age, gender, education, marital status and household income. The discussion focuses on people’s overall dyadic trust in relation to believing in one’s self and stressful situations.

keywords: trust, stress, self-esteem, hope