Presentation Title

Comparison of Air Pollution: High and Low Elevation Cities along the West Coast Region

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 269

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Air pollution is thicker and more dangerous even with clean renewable energy usage (Mastny 2005). It led to the reduced quality of life due to the increase of air pollutants like CO2 and other products from fossil fuel combustion (Ripabelli 2013). My hypothesis was to determine if there was a difference in air pollution between higher and lower elevation cities. In higher elevations, the air is thinner as there is less pressure from the air above (Baillie 2007). This reduction may affect the distribution of air pollutants present like ground-level ozone (N.C. Division of Air Quality 2015). In this paper, I collected and analyzed the data from the online databases: United States Environmental Protection Agency: Air Quality Index Report 2013 for the number of unhealthy days per year for sensitive groups and United States Geological Survey: Geographic Names Information System for the elevation values for populated areas in feet. The West Coast Region is California, Oregon, Washington, and Hawaii (Lew 2004). The cities in Nevada were included due to similar environmental and topographical factors while the cities in Hawaii were not due to incomplete data. The average number of unhealthy days for sensitive groups was 19.24 days. The average elevation was 1079.738 ft. The purposes of this study was for the home and environmental determination to reduce the risk and aggravation of respiratory diseases and ailments. This is due to a direct relationship between air pollution and respiratory disease risk (Ripabelli 2013). Another purpose was to determine which of the elevation groups required more countermeasures. For numerical analysis, I utilized a T test calculator resulting with t-value= 0.5802 and degrees of freedom=47.The p value 0.6155 was greater than the 0.05 error limit. Therefore, there was no significant difference in the air pollution exposure between the elevations of the cities. It is possible, since the areas in the study were commercialized to some degree and at the elevation inhabitable for long time human life, that the effects of reduced pressure were not pronounced enough.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 11:30 AM Nov 12th, 11:45 AM

Comparison of Air Pollution: High and Low Elevation Cities along the West Coast Region

HUB 269

Air pollution is thicker and more dangerous even with clean renewable energy usage (Mastny 2005). It led to the reduced quality of life due to the increase of air pollutants like CO2 and other products from fossil fuel combustion (Ripabelli 2013). My hypothesis was to determine if there was a difference in air pollution between higher and lower elevation cities. In higher elevations, the air is thinner as there is less pressure from the air above (Baillie 2007). This reduction may affect the distribution of air pollutants present like ground-level ozone (N.C. Division of Air Quality 2015). In this paper, I collected and analyzed the data from the online databases: United States Environmental Protection Agency: Air Quality Index Report 2013 for the number of unhealthy days per year for sensitive groups and United States Geological Survey: Geographic Names Information System for the elevation values for populated areas in feet. The West Coast Region is California, Oregon, Washington, and Hawaii (Lew 2004). The cities in Nevada were included due to similar environmental and topographical factors while the cities in Hawaii were not due to incomplete data. The average number of unhealthy days for sensitive groups was 19.24 days. The average elevation was 1079.738 ft. The purposes of this study was for the home and environmental determination to reduce the risk and aggravation of respiratory diseases and ailments. This is due to a direct relationship between air pollution and respiratory disease risk (Ripabelli 2013). Another purpose was to determine which of the elevation groups required more countermeasures. For numerical analysis, I utilized a T test calculator resulting with t-value= 0.5802 and degrees of freedom=47.The p value 0.6155 was greater than the 0.05 error limit. Therefore, there was no significant difference in the air pollution exposure between the elevations of the cities. It is possible, since the areas in the study were commercialized to some degree and at the elevation inhabitable for long time human life, that the effects of reduced pressure were not pronounced enough.