Presentation Title

De(re)segregation: Moving Towards Critical Race Accountability in Schools

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Watkins 2141

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Schools across the nation are evidencing that some of the most pressing issues in regards to education. Interest groups, policy officials, education researchers and other experts spend years for us to see the changes, adjustments, and improvements made in the education system today. Still, the issue of access to an equitable education remains at the forefront of American society and reality for many. Philosophy and jargon around the grand purposes of education, as well as other notions about how structures such as education should be working can be found in even the most shallow of discourse around American politics and relations today. However, very little can be said about progress and a true commitment to improving circumstances in education today. Students are facing harsh realities day in and day out, yet these experiences are disrespected and disregarded in the way school districts and other important departments function. Algorithms are often formulated to assess how schools are growing, but the factors used in these algorithms do not commonly address education in a way that is equitable and efficient in assessing schools, families, and communities of color. This research is intended to give reason and insight to the changing of state accountability measures in order to more effectively center students experiences. We conducted a critical discourse analysis around topics of education law, statewide accountability measures, and demographics in Minnesota and Georgia. We also grounded these measures in Critical Race Theory. A reflection was developed upon the findings from the critical discourse analysis. The major results of this project are a thorough analysis of legal cases leading to school resegregation, as well as a framework to develop a potential climate survey that can be rigorously regarded in school accountability measures.

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Nov 12th, 3:30 PM Nov 12th, 3:45 PM

De(re)segregation: Moving Towards Critical Race Accountability in Schools

Watkins 2141

Schools across the nation are evidencing that some of the most pressing issues in regards to education. Interest groups, policy officials, education researchers and other experts spend years for us to see the changes, adjustments, and improvements made in the education system today. Still, the issue of access to an equitable education remains at the forefront of American society and reality for many. Philosophy and jargon around the grand purposes of education, as well as other notions about how structures such as education should be working can be found in even the most shallow of discourse around American politics and relations today. However, very little can be said about progress and a true commitment to improving circumstances in education today. Students are facing harsh realities day in and day out, yet these experiences are disrespected and disregarded in the way school districts and other important departments function. Algorithms are often formulated to assess how schools are growing, but the factors used in these algorithms do not commonly address education in a way that is equitable and efficient in assessing schools, families, and communities of color. This research is intended to give reason and insight to the changing of state accountability measures in order to more effectively center students experiences. We conducted a critical discourse analysis around topics of education law, statewide accountability measures, and demographics in Minnesota and Georgia. We also grounded these measures in Critical Race Theory. A reflection was developed upon the findings from the critical discourse analysis. The major results of this project are a thorough analysis of legal cases leading to school resegregation, as well as a framework to develop a potential climate survey that can be rigorously regarded in school accountability measures.