Presentation Title

Chemotactic Behavior on Paper Microfluidic Platforms

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 367

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Microfluidics serves as a prominent platform for the design and development of a myriad of devices owing to their reduced reagent consumption rate and short sampling-to-result time. Chemotaxis is the movement of materials, particularly biological species, in response to the influence of chemical stimulation. Recently, chemotactic behavior in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic platforms in the separation of enzyme species has been described. We hypothesize that paper is a better platform for proving chemotaxis. Herein, we describe for the first time chemotactic behavior on a microfluidic paper analytical device (PAD) using as a model enzyme-substrate system glucose oxidase (GOx) and glucose. Glucose oxidase and glucose migrate through chromatography paper and chemotaxis is proven by examining varying intensities of color, which signify chemotactic movement of GOx to glucose or lack thereof. Color, on-chip, is achieved by the addition of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to catalyze the reaction between the product of glucose and GOx, hydrogen peroxide, and potassium iodide. Our results show that, with the appropriate microfluidic arrangement, molecular chemotaxis can afford products not obtainable under other experimental conditions and that can be predicted by modeling and simulation. PADs are easily fabricated by patterning hydrophobic materials in hydrophilic paper. They are low cost, compatible with biological samples, and have shown promise as platforms for various applications and in resource-limited settings. Current work is focused on optimizing the design of the PAD and its application to enzyme separations.

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Nov 12th, 10:15 AM Nov 12th, 10:30 AM

Chemotactic Behavior on Paper Microfluidic Platforms

HUB 367

Microfluidics serves as a prominent platform for the design and development of a myriad of devices owing to their reduced reagent consumption rate and short sampling-to-result time. Chemotaxis is the movement of materials, particularly biological species, in response to the influence of chemical stimulation. Recently, chemotactic behavior in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic platforms in the separation of enzyme species has been described. We hypothesize that paper is a better platform for proving chemotaxis. Herein, we describe for the first time chemotactic behavior on a microfluidic paper analytical device (PAD) using as a model enzyme-substrate system glucose oxidase (GOx) and glucose. Glucose oxidase and glucose migrate through chromatography paper and chemotaxis is proven by examining varying intensities of color, which signify chemotactic movement of GOx to glucose or lack thereof. Color, on-chip, is achieved by the addition of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) to catalyze the reaction between the product of glucose and GOx, hydrogen peroxide, and potassium iodide. Our results show that, with the appropriate microfluidic arrangement, molecular chemotaxis can afford products not obtainable under other experimental conditions and that can be predicted by modeling and simulation. PADs are easily fabricated by patterning hydrophobic materials in hydrophilic paper. They are low cost, compatible with biological samples, and have shown promise as platforms for various applications and in resource-limited settings. Current work is focused on optimizing the design of the PAD and its application to enzyme separations.