Presentation Title

The Power of Pawns: An Analysis of Parisian Identity and Loyalty during the Anglo-Burgundian Occupation, 1420-1436

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Watkins 1117

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

At the height of the Hundred Years’ War, from 1420 to 1436, the city of Paris was occupied by an alliance between the King of England and the Duke of Burgundy. Most studies of Paris during this period utilize a top-down perspective, basing their analyses on the actions of nobility; my research paper analyzes Parisian identity from the perspective of the lower classes. Drawing off a 15th-century primary source, the Journal d’un Bourgeois de Paris, which survives as an invaluable record of Parisian opinions during the Anglo-Burgundian occupation, my paper argues that Parisian identity was rarely expressed in relation to the French crown, and was mostly understood in local terms. I support my claim by assessing the importance of noble clout among locals, analyzing Parisian reactions in French and Anglo occupied times, and comparing the Parisian experience to that of other occupied regions in 15th century France. Ultimately, I suggest that any loyalties that Parisians held for those nobles and kings competing for their support, from the Duke of Burgundy to the French loyalist coalition known as the Armagnacs, were largely driven by Parisian self-interest.

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Nov 12th, 10:30 AM Nov 12th, 10:45 AM

The Power of Pawns: An Analysis of Parisian Identity and Loyalty during the Anglo-Burgundian Occupation, 1420-1436

Watkins 1117

At the height of the Hundred Years’ War, from 1420 to 1436, the city of Paris was occupied by an alliance between the King of England and the Duke of Burgundy. Most studies of Paris during this period utilize a top-down perspective, basing their analyses on the actions of nobility; my research paper analyzes Parisian identity from the perspective of the lower classes. Drawing off a 15th-century primary source, the Journal d’un Bourgeois de Paris, which survives as an invaluable record of Parisian opinions during the Anglo-Burgundian occupation, my paper argues that Parisian identity was rarely expressed in relation to the French crown, and was mostly understood in local terms. I support my claim by assessing the importance of noble clout among locals, analyzing Parisian reactions in French and Anglo occupied times, and comparing the Parisian experience to that of other occupied regions in 15th century France. Ultimately, I suggest that any loyalties that Parisians held for those nobles and kings competing for their support, from the Duke of Burgundy to the French loyalist coalition known as the Armagnacs, were largely driven by Parisian self-interest.