Presentation Title

Relative Toxicity of Stormwater Constituents to Early Life Stages of Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Surge 173

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Urban stormwater runoff poses a direct threat to the health of aquatic ecosystems. The lethal and sublethal toxicity of urban runoff to developing fish has been characterized using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) experimental model. Typical effects of runoff at sublethal concentrations include developmental delay, pericardial edema, and cardiovascular toxicity. Although an increasingly clear picture is being drawn of the damage the contaminant mixture in stormwater runoff is causing to aquatic organisms, it is still unknown what contaminant(s) in the mixture cause the observed effects. This study used the zebrafish experimental model to assess fish health following exposure to various motor vehicle fluids expected to be represented in stormwater runoff, including windshield washer fluid, used motor oil, and antifreeze. Embryos of each treatment were imaged and assessed for signs of delayed development, reduction in total length and eye area, and heart defects such as arrhythmia, circulatory stasis, and edema. Results indicate LC50 for zebrafish embryos were reached at 6.9% windshield washer fluid, 2.1% used motor oil, and 1.7% antifreeze. Zebrafish exposed to sublethal concentrations of the motor vehicle fluids experienced a reduction in eye area and total length, and an increase in pericardial and periventral regions with increased concentrations. Despite these general trends, each motor vehicle fluid produced a distinct phenotype in zebrafish, with large variations in the pericardial area associated with each fluid. Identifying the lethality and phenotypes associated with constituents in stormwater runoff can help to isolate the contributors having the most detrimental effects on aquatic life, expediting the implementation of effective mitigation strategies.

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Nov 12th, 2:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:15 PM

Relative Toxicity of Stormwater Constituents to Early Life Stages of Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

Surge 173

Urban stormwater runoff poses a direct threat to the health of aquatic ecosystems. The lethal and sublethal toxicity of urban runoff to developing fish has been characterized using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) experimental model. Typical effects of runoff at sublethal concentrations include developmental delay, pericardial edema, and cardiovascular toxicity. Although an increasingly clear picture is being drawn of the damage the contaminant mixture in stormwater runoff is causing to aquatic organisms, it is still unknown what contaminant(s) in the mixture cause the observed effects. This study used the zebrafish experimental model to assess fish health following exposure to various motor vehicle fluids expected to be represented in stormwater runoff, including windshield washer fluid, used motor oil, and antifreeze. Embryos of each treatment were imaged and assessed for signs of delayed development, reduction in total length and eye area, and heart defects such as arrhythmia, circulatory stasis, and edema. Results indicate LC50 for zebrafish embryos were reached at 6.9% windshield washer fluid, 2.1% used motor oil, and 1.7% antifreeze. Zebrafish exposed to sublethal concentrations of the motor vehicle fluids experienced a reduction in eye area and total length, and an increase in pericardial and periventral regions with increased concentrations. Despite these general trends, each motor vehicle fluid produced a distinct phenotype in zebrafish, with large variations in the pericardial area associated with each fluid. Identifying the lethality and phenotypes associated with constituents in stormwater runoff can help to isolate the contributors having the most detrimental effects on aquatic life, expediting the implementation of effective mitigation strategies.