Presentation Title

Near Infrared Erythrocyte-Mimicking Transducers (NETs) and Its Role as a Therapy for Cancer

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

Watkins 2141

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

Targeted therapies for cancer are often challenging because cancer cells are the same in chemical makeup to their non-mutated counterparts. However, their mechanical properties differ slightly. Cancer tumors form abnormally and lack lymphatic drainage. Our research focuses on cancer imaging and therapy using near infrared (NIR) erythrocyte-mimicking transducer (NETs) nanoparticles that take advantage of this enhanced permeability and retention effect (EPR) in tumors. When excited by NIR light, NETs transduces this energy to emit fluorescence, generate heat, and produce radical oxygen species (ROS). The fluorescence from NETs can be used for imaging tumors while the heat and ROS production can be used for photothermal and photodynamic therapies, respectively. These constructs are made by taking red blood cells, depleting them of hemoglobin, extruding them into nano-sized particles, then doping them with the only FDA-approved NIR chromophore, indocyanine green (ICG). Results of flow cytometry and fluorescent imaging shows SKBR3 breast cancer cells uptake NETs more than they do free ICG. The SKBR3 cells that have uptaken NETs have greater cell death when irradiated with an 808 nm laser. 2’,7’–dichlorofluoresceindiacetate was used as a dye probe to detect ROS while a live dead assay was used to determine cell death. Results of these tests suggest the increased SKBR3 uptake of NETs is accompanied by greater reactive oxygen species production as well as greater cell death. In addition to this, we showed that there is little to no cellular death when cells without NETs are irradiated. The sum of these results suggests NETs shows great promise for both the imaging and therapy of cancer.

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Nov 12th, 10:30 AM Nov 12th, 10:45 AM

Near Infrared Erythrocyte-Mimicking Transducers (NETs) and Its Role as a Therapy for Cancer

Watkins 2141

Targeted therapies for cancer are often challenging because cancer cells are the same in chemical makeup to their non-mutated counterparts. However, their mechanical properties differ slightly. Cancer tumors form abnormally and lack lymphatic drainage. Our research focuses on cancer imaging and therapy using near infrared (NIR) erythrocyte-mimicking transducer (NETs) nanoparticles that take advantage of this enhanced permeability and retention effect (EPR) in tumors. When excited by NIR light, NETs transduces this energy to emit fluorescence, generate heat, and produce radical oxygen species (ROS). The fluorescence from NETs can be used for imaging tumors while the heat and ROS production can be used for photothermal and photodynamic therapies, respectively. These constructs are made by taking red blood cells, depleting them of hemoglobin, extruding them into nano-sized particles, then doping them with the only FDA-approved NIR chromophore, indocyanine green (ICG). Results of flow cytometry and fluorescent imaging shows SKBR3 breast cancer cells uptake NETs more than they do free ICG. The SKBR3 cells that have uptaken NETs have greater cell death when irradiated with an 808 nm laser. 2’,7’–dichlorofluoresceindiacetate was used as a dye probe to detect ROS while a live dead assay was used to determine cell death. Results of these tests suggest the increased SKBR3 uptake of NETs is accompanied by greater reactive oxygen species production as well as greater cell death. In addition to this, we showed that there is little to no cellular death when cells without NETs are irradiated. The sum of these results suggests NETs shows great promise for both the imaging and therapy of cancer.