Presentation Title

The Design of An Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) for Detecting a Wide Variety of Ocean Pathogens Causing Blooms of Harmful Algae (HAB) and Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB).

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

MSE 103

Type of Presentation

Oral Talk

Abstract

The environmental sample processor (ESP) of this project is constructed from a biological sensing protocol that analyzes ocean water samples. The ESP methodology refined annually in this study over the past five years detected marine harmful algal blooms (HAB) and fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) from a coastal transect in Ventura County, California. Nutrient availability from terrestrial sources causes harmful bacterial organisms to rapidly expand, which later supports algae blooms. Most microorganisms are quickly dispersed by ocean currents, but coastal eddies trap populations which reach densities where they are easily detectable in this study. The contaminating bacteria are responsible for a wide variety of water borne illnesses. Additionally, some algae release toxins, such as domoic acid and yessotoxin, in response to unknown environmental signals. These algal toxins cause fish poisonings, seizures in marine mammals, and neurotoxic reactions in humans, including amnesic shellfish poisoning. The ESP in this study utilizes three biotechnology methods: traditional microbiology, Sanger DNA sequencing, and NEXTGEN DNA sequencing with 16s and 18s rRNA primers. The goal is detection of two algal species (Pseudo-nitzschia and Lingulodininum polyedrum), three bacterial species (Vibrio species causing Vibriosis, E.coli, and Enterococcus species), and antibiotic resistance (B-lactam/penicillin resistance). This study hypothesized that previously underreported HABs and FIBs, present along the Ventura coastline, could be detected by the ESP. The results showed reliable detection of one HAB algal species and one pathogenic FIB in previously unreported sites in Ventura County. In conclusion, this data supports a general model for the co-relationship of HABs and FIBS in toxic ocean events. The long-term goal of this project is to support the development of a marine environmental sample processing device that incorporates this refined HAB/FIB detection protocol in a submersible device for continuous ocean monitoring at specific sites.

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Nov 12th, 10:00 AM Nov 12th, 10:15 AM

The Design of An Environmental Sample Processor (ESP) for Detecting a Wide Variety of Ocean Pathogens Causing Blooms of Harmful Algae (HAB) and Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB).

MSE 103

The environmental sample processor (ESP) of this project is constructed from a biological sensing protocol that analyzes ocean water samples. The ESP methodology refined annually in this study over the past five years detected marine harmful algal blooms (HAB) and fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) from a coastal transect in Ventura County, California. Nutrient availability from terrestrial sources causes harmful bacterial organisms to rapidly expand, which later supports algae blooms. Most microorganisms are quickly dispersed by ocean currents, but coastal eddies trap populations which reach densities where they are easily detectable in this study. The contaminating bacteria are responsible for a wide variety of water borne illnesses. Additionally, some algae release toxins, such as domoic acid and yessotoxin, in response to unknown environmental signals. These algal toxins cause fish poisonings, seizures in marine mammals, and neurotoxic reactions in humans, including amnesic shellfish poisoning. The ESP in this study utilizes three biotechnology methods: traditional microbiology, Sanger DNA sequencing, and NEXTGEN DNA sequencing with 16s and 18s rRNA primers. The goal is detection of two algal species (Pseudo-nitzschia and Lingulodininum polyedrum), three bacterial species (Vibrio species causing Vibriosis, E.coli, and Enterococcus species), and antibiotic resistance (B-lactam/penicillin resistance). This study hypothesized that previously underreported HABs and FIBs, present along the Ventura coastline, could be detected by the ESP. The results showed reliable detection of one HAB algal species and one pathogenic FIB in previously unreported sites in Ventura County. In conclusion, this data supports a general model for the co-relationship of HABs and FIBS in toxic ocean events. The long-term goal of this project is to support the development of a marine environmental sample processing device that incorporates this refined HAB/FIB detection protocol in a submersible device for continuous ocean monitoring at specific sites.