Presentation Title

What's the buzz?: Native bee diversity of Occidental College

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#38

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Native bee abundance has declined in over 100 U.S. counties with high volumes agricultural production. Yet, native bee populations provide effective pollination services to supplement and balance declining domestic honey bee pollination. Over 100 crops in the U.S. and 90% of California’s plants are bee-pollinated. Areas with access to native resources are known to promote native bee abundance, thus urban areas often have very low native bee diversity. Urban gardens filled with native greenery can serve as an oasis for native bees. The campus of Occidental College located in urban Los Angeles is not only surrounded by native chaparral, but it is also an urban garden. In my study, I investigated which native bee species were present on campus during the spring and summer of 2016, and which flowers they visited. I also made a reference collection of 72 preserved bee specimens. I found 12 native bee genera (species identification pending from melittologist). Three genera of bees were more intensively studied, and these were found to be collecting pollen from four plant species. Future work will continue to survey native bee presence on campus and what species of flowers are visited by these bees using pollen analysis.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

What's the buzz?: Native bee diversity of Occidental College

HUB 302-#38

Native bee abundance has declined in over 100 U.S. counties with high volumes agricultural production. Yet, native bee populations provide effective pollination services to supplement and balance declining domestic honey bee pollination. Over 100 crops in the U.S. and 90% of California’s plants are bee-pollinated. Areas with access to native resources are known to promote native bee abundance, thus urban areas often have very low native bee diversity. Urban gardens filled with native greenery can serve as an oasis for native bees. The campus of Occidental College located in urban Los Angeles is not only surrounded by native chaparral, but it is also an urban garden. In my study, I investigated which native bee species were present on campus during the spring and summer of 2016, and which flowers they visited. I also made a reference collection of 72 preserved bee specimens. I found 12 native bee genera (species identification pending from melittologist). Three genera of bees were more intensively studied, and these were found to be collecting pollen from four plant species. Future work will continue to survey native bee presence on campus and what species of flowers are visited by these bees using pollen analysis.