Presentation Title

APPS TO EAT BY: CONSUMPTION INVOLVEMENT IN THE MILLENIAL AGE, TRANSFORMED BY APP USAGE

Start Date

12-11-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

12-11-2016 2:00 PM

Location

HUB 302-189

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Many have witnessed the rise of technology, but some, have grown-up right alongside it. “Millennials”, born between 1982-2004, have learned to leverage the tools of technology for information gathering, social interactions, and even quintessential daily routines… Including how to eat. Research has been done on Millennials’ tech-savvy lifestyles, but not nearly as much has been done on the different food consumption habits this life has produced. The purpose of this research is to understand if a measurable relationship (i.e. correlation, covariance) exists between application usage, and the level to which individuals are involved with their food and beverage consumption choices. We propose individuals with high involvement with food and beverage consumption will use more apps providing detailed reviews and opinions (i.e. Yelp), monthly on-demand subscription apps (i.e. Blue Apron), will visit specialty food stores more frequently, and will use delivery apps (i.e. GrubHub) less frequently. Conversely, we propose that individuals with low levels food and beverage involvement will use review or opinion based apps, subscription apps, and visit specialty food stores less; while using delivery apps at a more frequently. To test these hypotheses we collect data from focus groups to explore the topic; followed with a survey measuring involvement, cohort identification and food consumption through app usage; lastly interviews held to understand the reasons behind some choices millennials expressed in the survey. User and Gratification Theory and Generation Cohort Theory are used as foundations to understand the generational effect on consumption habits. Food Choice Questionnaire (1995) and Consumer Involvement Profiles (1985) are used as measurement scales to determine how category involvement differs within the millennial generation, and impacts their food consumption. Upon the completion of data collection, this study will contribute to our understanding of app usage behavior among millennials focused on their changing food consumption habits.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

APPS TO EAT BY: CONSUMPTION INVOLVEMENT IN THE MILLENIAL AGE, TRANSFORMED BY APP USAGE

HUB 302-189

Many have witnessed the rise of technology, but some, have grown-up right alongside it. “Millennials”, born between 1982-2004, have learned to leverage the tools of technology for information gathering, social interactions, and even quintessential daily routines… Including how to eat. Research has been done on Millennials’ tech-savvy lifestyles, but not nearly as much has been done on the different food consumption habits this life has produced. The purpose of this research is to understand if a measurable relationship (i.e. correlation, covariance) exists between application usage, and the level to which individuals are involved with their food and beverage consumption choices. We propose individuals with high involvement with food and beverage consumption will use more apps providing detailed reviews and opinions (i.e. Yelp), monthly on-demand subscription apps (i.e. Blue Apron), will visit specialty food stores more frequently, and will use delivery apps (i.e. GrubHub) less frequently. Conversely, we propose that individuals with low levels food and beverage involvement will use review or opinion based apps, subscription apps, and visit specialty food stores less; while using delivery apps at a more frequently. To test these hypotheses we collect data from focus groups to explore the topic; followed with a survey measuring involvement, cohort identification and food consumption through app usage; lastly interviews held to understand the reasons behind some choices millennials expressed in the survey. User and Gratification Theory and Generation Cohort Theory are used as foundations to understand the generational effect on consumption habits. Food Choice Questionnaire (1995) and Consumer Involvement Profiles (1985) are used as measurement scales to determine how category involvement differs within the millennial generation, and impacts their food consumption. Upon the completion of data collection, this study will contribute to our understanding of app usage behavior among millennials focused on their changing food consumption habits.