Presentation Title

Consistent detection of pathogenic bacteria and algae at sampling sites along the Ventura coastline using a laboratory algorithm for three technologies in an environmental sample processor.

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#60

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

In the ocean, harmful organisms can bloom suddenly in response to nutrient availability and then be dispersed quickly by ocean currents. This five-year study detected marine harmful algal blooms (HABs) and fecal indicator bacteria (FIBs) from a coastal transect in Ventura County, California. Ocean FIBs thrive where there is wastewater, agricultural runoff, and fluctuations in ocean temperature. These include the pathogenic bacterial species Vibrio parahemolyticus which HABs, such as Pseudo-nitzschia and Lingulodininum polyedrum, are known to prey upon as a food source. Sporadically and unpredictably, HABs release toxins, including domoic acid and yessotoxin, in response to environmental cues. Algal toxins can cause fish poisoning, seizures in marine mammals, and neurotoxic reactions in humans, including amnesic shellfish poisoning. This study hypothesized that previously underreported HABs and FIBs were present along the Ventura coastline. Three experimental approaches were taken: traditional microbiology methods (filters with agar plate isolation, and electron microscopy), first-generation PCR and DNA sequencing, and next-generation microbiome DNA sequencing of 18S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes. The results revealed sporadic detection from HABs and FIBs at most sites except one, the jetty leading to the entrance to the Port of Hueneme at Silver Strand beach. The aggregate data was used to design a lab-based environmental sampling processor (ESP) algorithm. In the future, this HAB/FIB detection algorithm could be included on a remote marine environmental sample processor (ESP) device for continuous monitoring.

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Consistent detection of pathogenic bacteria and algae at sampling sites along the Ventura coastline using a laboratory algorithm for three technologies in an environmental sample processor.

HUB 302-#60

In the ocean, harmful organisms can bloom suddenly in response to nutrient availability and then be dispersed quickly by ocean currents. This five-year study detected marine harmful algal blooms (HABs) and fecal indicator bacteria (FIBs) from a coastal transect in Ventura County, California. Ocean FIBs thrive where there is wastewater, agricultural runoff, and fluctuations in ocean temperature. These include the pathogenic bacterial species Vibrio parahemolyticus which HABs, such as Pseudo-nitzschia and Lingulodininum polyedrum, are known to prey upon as a food source. Sporadically and unpredictably, HABs release toxins, including domoic acid and yessotoxin, in response to environmental cues. Algal toxins can cause fish poisoning, seizures in marine mammals, and neurotoxic reactions in humans, including amnesic shellfish poisoning. This study hypothesized that previously underreported HABs and FIBs were present along the Ventura coastline. Three experimental approaches were taken: traditional microbiology methods (filters with agar plate isolation, and electron microscopy), first-generation PCR and DNA sequencing, and next-generation microbiome DNA sequencing of 18S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes. The results revealed sporadic detection from HABs and FIBs at most sites except one, the jetty leading to the entrance to the Port of Hueneme at Silver Strand beach. The aggregate data was used to design a lab-based environmental sampling processor (ESP) algorithm. In the future, this HAB/FIB detection algorithm could be included on a remote marine environmental sample processor (ESP) device for continuous monitoring.