Presentation Title

Indole’s role in the cell interactions of E. coli and Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus in unique biofilm growth

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#34

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a Gram-negative predatory bacterium that preys upon other Gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli. Because of its ability to prey upon other Gram-negative bacteria, B. bacteriovorus has a potential to be used as a therapeutic agent against bacterial infections or as an environmental agent to control unwanted pathogen growth. To evaluate the feasibility of this application of B. bacteriovorus, we must first understand the biochemical mechanisms of predation at interfaces. Based upon some recent literature, we hypothesize that indole production by E. coli plays a role in the unique spatial arrangement in the growth of the co-culture of E. coli and its predator B. bacteriovorus on a nutrient-rich surface. We experimentally confirmed the composition of the inner and outer regions of the spatially-resolved biofilm growth, with the inner composed mainly of the predator B. bacteriovorus and surrounded by its prey E. coli and bdelloplasts in an outer ring. While we do not yet fully understand the mechanism that indole plays, we found that it does not play a role in the spatial arrangement of the biofilm growth. However, provocative evidence suggests that E. coli production of indole is a way of slowing down or interfering the predation of B. bacteriovorus.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Indole’s role in the cell interactions of E. coli and Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus in unique biofilm growth

HUB 302-#34

Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a Gram-negative predatory bacterium that preys upon other Gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli. Because of its ability to prey upon other Gram-negative bacteria, B. bacteriovorus has a potential to be used as a therapeutic agent against bacterial infections or as an environmental agent to control unwanted pathogen growth. To evaluate the feasibility of this application of B. bacteriovorus, we must first understand the biochemical mechanisms of predation at interfaces. Based upon some recent literature, we hypothesize that indole production by E. coli plays a role in the unique spatial arrangement in the growth of the co-culture of E. coli and its predator B. bacteriovorus on a nutrient-rich surface. We experimentally confirmed the composition of the inner and outer regions of the spatially-resolved biofilm growth, with the inner composed mainly of the predator B. bacteriovorus and surrounded by its prey E. coli and bdelloplasts in an outer ring. While we do not yet fully understand the mechanism that indole plays, we found that it does not play a role in the spatial arrangement of the biofilm growth. However, provocative evidence suggests that E. coli production of indole is a way of slowing down or interfering the predation of B. bacteriovorus.