Presentation Title

Electromechanical Reshaping of Cartilage and the Molecular and Chemical Effects of Water Electrolysis on Tissue and Cell Viability

Presenter Information

Lynn He, Occidental CollegeFollow

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#58

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

EMR relies on cartilage’s intrinsic properties as a charged viscoelastic material and combines mechanical deformation with the application of low-level DC electric fields. The mechanism for shape change is dependent on the electrolysis of water and subsequent acidification of the tissue. Protons generated by the oxidation of water near the surface of the cartilage diffuse into the tissue and protonate immobilized anions within the structural matrix. Once protonated the tissue loses its ability to resist deformation and becomes easily malleable. Subsequent re-equilibration to physiological pH restores the immobilized negative charges and locks the new shape into place resulting in sustained shape change of the tissue. One danger of this technique is that it can generate reactive oxygen species. For this technique to become clinically viable, it is necessary to set time and potential parameters on the electrode. This will allow for safe and efficient use on patients. Thus, it becomes vital to synthesize a compound that can detect these reactive oxygen species in the cartilage when using the electrode to generate a pH landscape that can show the diffusion of protons as a function of space and time.

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Electromechanical Reshaping of Cartilage and the Molecular and Chemical Effects of Water Electrolysis on Tissue and Cell Viability

HUB 302-#58

EMR relies on cartilage’s intrinsic properties as a charged viscoelastic material and combines mechanical deformation with the application of low-level DC electric fields. The mechanism for shape change is dependent on the electrolysis of water and subsequent acidification of the tissue. Protons generated by the oxidation of water near the surface of the cartilage diffuse into the tissue and protonate immobilized anions within the structural matrix. Once protonated the tissue loses its ability to resist deformation and becomes easily malleable. Subsequent re-equilibration to physiological pH restores the immobilized negative charges and locks the new shape into place resulting in sustained shape change of the tissue. One danger of this technique is that it can generate reactive oxygen species. For this technique to become clinically viable, it is necessary to set time and potential parameters on the electrode. This will allow for safe and efficient use on patients. Thus, it becomes vital to synthesize a compound that can detect these reactive oxygen species in the cartilage when using the electrode to generate a pH landscape that can show the diffusion of protons as a function of space and time.