Presentation Title

Maximizing Reproducibility in the Fabrication of Electrochemical DNA Sensors

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#46

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Early detection of diseases is an important focus for disease diagnostics which can allow for earlier intervention, improving outcomes, reducing spread, and improving the overall quality of life for patients. Thus the development and optimization of point of care sensor is a critical area of study to serve this demand. The conformation-based electrochemical biosensor produces an electrochemical signal that is dependent on the conformation of DNA molecules on the surface of an electrode. This class of biosensors is an excellent candidate for being a point of care sensor due to its high sensitivity and specificity for target molecules. However, improving the signal gain, their long term stability, multiplexing and reproducibility are all important factors to develop sensors with greater precision and ability to serve a variety of applications.

Here I will investigate the mechanism of DNA deposition and monolayer formation with the aim to optimize the fabrication method of such sensors and improve their performances. In order to study the DNA deposition on gold electrode surface, I will use methylene blue modified DNA molecules and square wave voltammetry. Methylene blue molecules will serve as redox reporters that will aid in quantifying and detecting the presence of DNA on the gold surface. Furthermore, chronoamperometry and square wave voltammetry pulsing techniques will be evaluated as a possible means to control DNA deposition on electrode surfaces.

I expect that the results of this study can optimize fabrication methods to create conformation-based electrochemical sensors with better performances.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Maximizing Reproducibility in the Fabrication of Electrochemical DNA Sensors

HUB 302-#46

Early detection of diseases is an important focus for disease diagnostics which can allow for earlier intervention, improving outcomes, reducing spread, and improving the overall quality of life for patients. Thus the development and optimization of point of care sensor is a critical area of study to serve this demand. The conformation-based electrochemical biosensor produces an electrochemical signal that is dependent on the conformation of DNA molecules on the surface of an electrode. This class of biosensors is an excellent candidate for being a point of care sensor due to its high sensitivity and specificity for target molecules. However, improving the signal gain, their long term stability, multiplexing and reproducibility are all important factors to develop sensors with greater precision and ability to serve a variety of applications.

Here I will investigate the mechanism of DNA deposition and monolayer formation with the aim to optimize the fabrication method of such sensors and improve their performances. In order to study the DNA deposition on gold electrode surface, I will use methylene blue modified DNA molecules and square wave voltammetry. Methylene blue molecules will serve as redox reporters that will aid in quantifying and detecting the presence of DNA on the gold surface. Furthermore, chronoamperometry and square wave voltammetry pulsing techniques will be evaluated as a possible means to control DNA deposition on electrode surfaces.

I expect that the results of this study can optimize fabrication methods to create conformation-based electrochemical sensors with better performances.