Presentation Title

Studies to understand floral transition and inflorescence patterning in Aquilegia coerulea

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#81

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Aquilegia coerulea (columbine) is an emerging model system in plants. Its small sized genome, short life span, availability of genetic and genomic, tools and phylogenetic position between grasses and core eudicots make it an excellent system for genetic and evolutionary studies. The genus Aquilegia has experienced rapid diversification in the past 1-5 million years resulting in about 70 identified species inhabiting diverse habitats. Aquilegia has five types of floral organs including sepals, petals, stamens, carpels and staminodia, a novel floral organ. Speciation has led to changes in morphological characteristics, specifically the spur length of petals. In order to transition from a vegetative to flowering state, cold treatment, or vernalization, is an important requirement. This requirement varies among the different Aquilegia species. For example A. formosa and A. vulgaris require about 6-8 weeks of vernalization while A. coerulea only requires 3-4 weeks. In our current study we are using rapid-cycling A. coerulea as a model system to understand the genetic and developmental changes in the shoot apical meristem during the transition from vegetative to reproductive state. We are also studying inflorescence patterns in different Aquilegia species to understand the evolution of flower arrangement in the genus.

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Studies to understand floral transition and inflorescence patterning in Aquilegia coerulea

HUB 302-#81

Aquilegia coerulea (columbine) is an emerging model system in plants. Its small sized genome, short life span, availability of genetic and genomic, tools and phylogenetic position between grasses and core eudicots make it an excellent system for genetic and evolutionary studies. The genus Aquilegia has experienced rapid diversification in the past 1-5 million years resulting in about 70 identified species inhabiting diverse habitats. Aquilegia has five types of floral organs including sepals, petals, stamens, carpels and staminodia, a novel floral organ. Speciation has led to changes in morphological characteristics, specifically the spur length of petals. In order to transition from a vegetative to flowering state, cold treatment, or vernalization, is an important requirement. This requirement varies among the different Aquilegia species. For example A. formosa and A. vulgaris require about 6-8 weeks of vernalization while A. coerulea only requires 3-4 weeks. In our current study we are using rapid-cycling A. coerulea as a model system to understand the genetic and developmental changes in the shoot apical meristem during the transition from vegetative to reproductive state. We are also studying inflorescence patterns in different Aquilegia species to understand the evolution of flower arrangement in the genus.