Presentation Title

Design and Manufacturing of a Composite Automobile Chassis

Start Date

12-11-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

12-11-2016 5:00 PM

Location

HUB 302-#28

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

The Formula SAE collegiate design series challenges engineering students to design, test, and race a vehicle against other engineering students. In a racing situation, a lightweight vehicle contributes to better acceleration in all attitudes as well as improving fuel efficiency. A faster, more fuel efficient vehicle will gain the most points at competition. In addition, FSAE requires a design to be safe for student operation. This is ensured by completing a Structural Equivalency Sheet (SES), where the representative properties of components surrounding the driver must show a minimum strength value. Composites have the advantage of placing material strength where required only, minimizing wasted mass when compared to a traditionally steel structure. This research aims to develop a design method for creating a chassis structure that will decrease puncture shear without sacrificing bending strength.

Based on calculation used in the SES, we can see which design variable affect bending stiffness of a representative sample, and develop several baseline composite panel designs using material data and composite sandwich theory. Starting with the necessary shear strength from SES, we can use material analysis software to develop a pattern for laying up our chosen carbon fiber material that will give us minimum necessary mechanical properties. Those properties can then be applied to the SES bending stiffness equations while adjusting geometric parameters to meet the strength requirements in bending. Once various composite panels are developed, physical samples will be manufactured and tested. From those samples, we will select designs which offer low mass and appropriate mechanical properties.

We expect an increased core thickness can achieve better bending stiffness with a thinner laminate. This will mitigate parasitic shear strength while reducing mass. Testing will show if the increased core thickness will provide necessary bending stiffness or create a new failure mode.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

Design and Manufacturing of a Composite Automobile Chassis

HUB 302-#28

The Formula SAE collegiate design series challenges engineering students to design, test, and race a vehicle against other engineering students. In a racing situation, a lightweight vehicle contributes to better acceleration in all attitudes as well as improving fuel efficiency. A faster, more fuel efficient vehicle will gain the most points at competition. In addition, FSAE requires a design to be safe for student operation. This is ensured by completing a Structural Equivalency Sheet (SES), where the representative properties of components surrounding the driver must show a minimum strength value. Composites have the advantage of placing material strength where required only, minimizing wasted mass when compared to a traditionally steel structure. This research aims to develop a design method for creating a chassis structure that will decrease puncture shear without sacrificing bending strength.

Based on calculation used in the SES, we can see which design variable affect bending stiffness of a representative sample, and develop several baseline composite panel designs using material data and composite sandwich theory. Starting with the necessary shear strength from SES, we can use material analysis software to develop a pattern for laying up our chosen carbon fiber material that will give us minimum necessary mechanical properties. Those properties can then be applied to the SES bending stiffness equations while adjusting geometric parameters to meet the strength requirements in bending. Once various composite panels are developed, physical samples will be manufactured and tested. From those samples, we will select designs which offer low mass and appropriate mechanical properties.

We expect an increased core thickness can achieve better bending stiffness with a thinner laminate. This will mitigate parasitic shear strength while reducing mass. Testing will show if the increased core thickness will provide necessary bending stiffness or create a new failure mode.