Presentation Title

Water Quality Evaluation in a Reclaimed Water Distribution Network

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#68

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

As drought conditions in California continue to deplete fresh water reserves, alternative water sources are necessary for agriculture and groundwater replenishment. Reclaimed water represents an important and ready-to-use water source for irrigation. Concerns of the use of reclaimed water are primarily the compounds that remain after treatment, since studies have shown that microbial growth occurs in drinking water networks. It is hypothesized that reclaimed water quality changes as it flows through the distribution system and there is an increase in microorganism activity. Reclaimed water was sampled at three locations in the California Polytechnic University, Pomona (CPP) by tapping into the distribution pipeline network. The locations sampled were the Manor House (A), located northwest of the center of campus, the Rose Garden (B), located northeast of the center of campus, and the Music Building (C), located south west of the center of campus. Water quality tests were conducted for various parameters and constituents, including true and apparent color, temperature, pH, total organic carbon (TOC), alkalinity, nitrate, and nitrite. Results indicate that the presence of TOC, nitrate, and nitrite, display a continuous trend of succession from locations A, B, and C. Alkalinity values are similar at all three locations, but seems to vary day by day from 139 – 177 mg/L as CaCO3. Future testing includes total chlorine, total coliforms, ATP, and heterotrophic plate count (HPC). Additional research must be completed in order to establish spatial statistics and seasonal trends throughout the system to confirm the microbial changes in the pipeline distribution system.

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Water Quality Evaluation in a Reclaimed Water Distribution Network

HUB 302-#68

As drought conditions in California continue to deplete fresh water reserves, alternative water sources are necessary for agriculture and groundwater replenishment. Reclaimed water represents an important and ready-to-use water source for irrigation. Concerns of the use of reclaimed water are primarily the compounds that remain after treatment, since studies have shown that microbial growth occurs in drinking water networks. It is hypothesized that reclaimed water quality changes as it flows through the distribution system and there is an increase in microorganism activity. Reclaimed water was sampled at three locations in the California Polytechnic University, Pomona (CPP) by tapping into the distribution pipeline network. The locations sampled were the Manor House (A), located northwest of the center of campus, the Rose Garden (B), located northeast of the center of campus, and the Music Building (C), located south west of the center of campus. Water quality tests were conducted for various parameters and constituents, including true and apparent color, temperature, pH, total organic carbon (TOC), alkalinity, nitrate, and nitrite. Results indicate that the presence of TOC, nitrate, and nitrite, display a continuous trend of succession from locations A, B, and C. Alkalinity values are similar at all three locations, but seems to vary day by day from 139 – 177 mg/L as CaCO3. Future testing includes total chlorine, total coliforms, ATP, and heterotrophic plate count (HPC). Additional research must be completed in order to establish spatial statistics and seasonal trends throughout the system to confirm the microbial changes in the pipeline distribution system.