Presentation Title

One Water Initiative: Storm Water Integration via Bioretention Cells

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-#71

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

Bioretention cells are an innovation in storm water runoff management that regulates volumes of the runoff and relieves environmental impairment within the runoff. Few countys have taken advantage of this technology due to a lack of testing stormwater levels and conditions specific to their conditions. This study measures the hydraulic conductivity of various types and mixture proportions of media in a bioretention device designed to satisfy Low-Impact Development standards for stormwater runoff. The study is conducted in partnership with the City of Los Angeles. One of its objectives is to collect data to provide recommendations on design specifications for optimization of bioretention cell performance in the county of Los Angeles. These cells are to provide a flow of 5 inches per minute through the media. The biofiltration design criteria is provided by the Ventura County Technical Guidance Manual. Volume control will be measured by using the Modified Rational Method. Based on previous experiments, the prediction of the study is that mix ratios with higher percentages of sand will contribute to a faster hydraulic conductivity. The results of the study will be used to revise the design criteria to allow developers build the most effective bioretention systems within the given constraints.

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Nov 12th, 4:00 PM Nov 12th, 5:00 PM

One Water Initiative: Storm Water Integration via Bioretention Cells

HUB 302-#71

Bioretention cells are an innovation in storm water runoff management that regulates volumes of the runoff and relieves environmental impairment within the runoff. Few countys have taken advantage of this technology due to a lack of testing stormwater levels and conditions specific to their conditions. This study measures the hydraulic conductivity of various types and mixture proportions of media in a bioretention device designed to satisfy Low-Impact Development standards for stormwater runoff. The study is conducted in partnership with the City of Los Angeles. One of its objectives is to collect data to provide recommendations on design specifications for optimization of bioretention cell performance in the county of Los Angeles. These cells are to provide a flow of 5 inches per minute through the media. The biofiltration design criteria is provided by the Ventura County Technical Guidance Manual. Volume control will be measured by using the Modified Rational Method. Based on previous experiments, the prediction of the study is that mix ratios with higher percentages of sand will contribute to a faster hydraulic conductivity. The results of the study will be used to revise the design criteria to allow developers build the most effective bioretention systems within the given constraints.