Presentation Title

Prostitution: Legal or Not?

Start Date

November 2016

End Date

November 2016

Location

HUB 302-98

Type of Presentation

Poster

Abstract

A healthy sex life acts as one of the most influential factors to an individual’s well-being and also serves a vital role in the survival of the human race. However, many societies have tabooed and bastardized the act of non-reproductive sex. In many countries, including the United States, the legality of prostitution remains a topic of morality politics. The subject matter seems to be gridlocked in an eternal debate. Through secondary data analysis, the current study examines and compares the government policies of multiple countries regarding prostitution. The study is further expanded by analyzing different variables such as the general health status of prostitutes and also differences in health of drug-using prostitutes versus non-prostitute drug users. Research shows that 93% of street workers and 69% of indoor workers are found to have used an illegal drug within the past six months. Legalizing prostitution would certainly decrease the drug use among prostitutes. Different motivations for joining the commercial sex industry are also considered and labeled with sociological theories that best explained them. The results conclude that legalizing prostitution would be far more beneficial than detrimental to the American society and government. The general welfare of prostitutes would be enhanced by the government by enforcing strict health regulations, including restricting drug use. Legalization would also allow the government to earn revenue by taxing the prostitutes as legitimate businesspeople.

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Nov 12th, 1:00 PM Nov 12th, 2:00 PM

Prostitution: Legal or Not?

HUB 302-98

A healthy sex life acts as one of the most influential factors to an individual’s well-being and also serves a vital role in the survival of the human race. However, many societies have tabooed and bastardized the act of non-reproductive sex. In many countries, including the United States, the legality of prostitution remains a topic of morality politics. The subject matter seems to be gridlocked in an eternal debate. Through secondary data analysis, the current study examines and compares the government policies of multiple countries regarding prostitution. The study is further expanded by analyzing different variables such as the general health status of prostitutes and also differences in health of drug-using prostitutes versus non-prostitute drug users. Research shows that 93% of street workers and 69% of indoor workers are found to have used an illegal drug within the past six months. Legalizing prostitution would certainly decrease the drug use among prostitutes. Different motivations for joining the commercial sex industry are also considered and labeled with sociological theories that best explained them. The results conclude that legalizing prostitution would be far more beneficial than detrimental to the American society and government. The general welfare of prostitutes would be enhanced by the government by enforcing strict health regulations, including restricting drug use. Legalization would also allow the government to earn revenue by taxing the prostitutes as legitimate businesspeople.